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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  January 22, 2018 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. you quit ukip if you want to, but i'm staying. leader henry bolton faces a wave of resignations from key positions as pressure mounts on him to quit. i am not making any comment. he's saying nothing at the moment but is making a statement at lipm. the head of the army warns that britain is struggling to keep up with russia's military and needs more money, not more cuts. do figures add up, nhs trusts might have to recalculate their performance data after the current figures may have led to misleading conclusions. an ejector seat manufacturer has admitted breaching health and safety law over the death ofa health and safety law over the death of a red arrows pilot in november 2011. holly has the sport. and, sad news, the death announced ofjimmy arnfield. and a shock exit from the australian
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open more details at half past. alina has all the weather. is that the last of the snow? maybe the last day for a while that i talk about snow, things turning milder but also wetter and windier. all the details later. thank you very much. also coming up. what could be better than one royal wedding in one year, well, two, of course. buckingham palace announces prince andrew's daughter princess eugenie is getting married. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. pressure is continuing to mount on the ukip leader henry bolton after a string of resignations of senior members this morning. the party's assistant deputy leader, and its immigration, trade,
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education, and local government spokesmen have all quit, joining the deputy leader margot parker, who resigned last night. they've all stood down in protest at henry bolton's refusal to quit as leader — following a string of revelations about his private life — even though the party executive backed a vote of no confidence in him. our political correspondent alex forysth, reports. i'm not making any comment. despite growing pressure, he says he's not going anywhere, henry bolton insisting he wants to keep leading ukip, even though the ruling body says he should quit and now, a string of senior members have resigned because he will not go. including margot parker, who stepped down as deputy leader, mike hookem has quit as assistant deputy, tim aker, as local government spokesman, david curtin, as front man for education, william dartmouth has given up his job as trade spokesman, and john bickley has walked away from his role with immigration. if he hangs around politics, given what has happened and the nature of everything that has happened, it will not be good for him or everyone he is with. my advice would be, look, henry,
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we don't want to keep arguing with you and causing you any more trouble, why don't you just go and sort out your personal life. it is over his relationship with 25—year—old jo marney, he says it is over after she had to apologise for sending racist text messages, that has not appeased critics. after being elected only four months ago, promising to restore unity, his position risks tearing the party apart. this is where ukip has marked some of its big moments, outside europe house, a key eu base in london, but after its success in the brexit referendum, ukip lost direction and has been plagued by bitter infighting, with four leaders in just over a year, prompting some to ask whether now anyone can lead this party back from the brink. the party chairman today insisted ukip still has a role in representing those who backed brexit. that is why ukip are so important and why we must stay on the field of play,
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get our house in order and do it quickly, but once we have, we have a purpose. 17.4 million voters are it. even those embroiled in the leadership crisis recognise how damaging it is for the for the beleaguered party. with me is matthew goodwin, professor of politics at the university of kent and co—author of revolt on the right. most of the hierarchy has decided they don't want him to stay on in this position. it means potentially ukip is heading to another disruptive leadership election and some are asking whether this is possibly the end for what was at one point the third most popular party in britain. now, the leader says he is holding on, henry bolton. he is
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making a statement later today. do you think he can hold on?|j making a statement later today. do you think he can hold on? i think it's very unlikely that henry bolton will stay on, if he decides to carry on despite the resignations, then this will go to a vote of all ukip members, of course they have fewer members, of course they have fewer members than during the referendum period but the members will effectively have to sign off on the vote of no confidence that was passed by the national executive committee, ukip‘s ruling body. passed by the national executive committee, ukip's ruling body. nigel farage, what's his reaction to this going to be, do you think? nigel farage has been quite quiet, i suspect that there are two things maybe going on. one is that we have this internal story about ukip and can it survive, will bolton be replaced? the can it survive, will bolton be replaced ? the other can it survive, will bolton be replaced? the other is what's the longer term gain plan for these eurosceptics? that's where there have been rumours and rumblings about nigel farage with some of his allies setting up possibly a new
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cross— party allies setting up possibly a new cross—party movement or political party that would try and pressure the conservative party to deliver what they would argue is real brexit, nojurisdiction forthe european courts, end freedom of movement, sign free trade deals with countries around the world, all that stuff. is there anybody in the wings of ukip as it stands at the moment who could take over as leader and try and grab this mess, it is a mess, and move forward with it? the problem for ukip is they don't have household names perhaps some other parties do. we always have this question, was ukip a political party 01’ was question, was ukip a political party or was it a man? question, was ukip a political party orwas ita man? was it question, was ukip a political party or was it a man? was it actually a movement in its own right or was it nigel farage? we never really knew. what we can say is that ukip were really most successful when they we re really most successful when they were under farage's leadership. when they haven't been they've always seemed to struggle to connect to win over large numbers of voters, we discovered with diane james, paul nuttall. ukip has lived for 25
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yea rs, nuttall. ukip has lived for 25 years, it's had 1a different leaders, remarkable rate of turnover. how will history judge this day do you think for ukip, is this day do you think for ukip, is this the day it died?|j this day do you think for ukip, is this the day it died? i think it's too early to say. ukip may linger on. but i think historians will remember ukip as a party that had almost no representation in the house of commons, but nonetheless played a central role in delivering some of the most radical political changes that britain has seen for decades, if not centuries. great to talk to you, thank you very much. as the working week begins in the united states, hundreds of thousands of employees will not be behind their desks, as federal government services are still shut down. senators held a rare sunday sitting yesterday, but delayed a vote on a budget measure, which would have allowed civil servants to go back to work. democrats and republicans remain in deadlock, with president trump's immigration policy one of the main sticking points. from washington, david willis reports. members of congress met throughout the weekend, desperate to find a solution to a crisis that has shut down
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the government of the largest economy in the world. at the other end of pennsylvania avenue, the president, too, was in residence, after shelving plans to attend a fundraising dinner at his florida retreat mar—a—lago. at issue, the fate of these people, the so—called dreamers, young people brought to the united states illegally whom president trump is threatening to deport in a few weeks' time. democrats want to link their fate to a funding bill that would end the shutdown. the republicans want it debated separately. yet, despite having the majority in both houses of congress, republicans need the opposition‘s support in order to get a funding bill through the senate. after several days of rancour, the republican leader pledged to bring the dreamers issue up for debate within the next few weeks, in return for ending the shutdown. the shutdown should stop today. and we'll soon have a vote that
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will allow us to do exactly that. so, let's step back from the brink, let's stop victimising the american people and get back to work on their behalf. but democrats are adamant they want an earlier agreement to protect the dreamers from deportation. we've had several conversations, talks will continue. but we have yet to reach an agreement on a path forward that would be acceptable for both sides. the white house released pictures of president trump receiving updates from capitol hill, but the president has been criticised by democrats for what they call his shifting positions on immigration. chuck schumer said on saturday it was like negotiating withjell—o. the last government shutdown here in 2013 lasted 16 days and caused the closure of many national parks and monuments. it also led to around 800,000 workers being placed on temporary leave.
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the effects of this shutdown will start to be felt today, as the working week gets under way here. the senate will reconvene later in the hope of resolving this game of political brinkmanship. the vote is set for noon. david willis, bbc news, washington. herfather, her father, believed to herfather, believed to be bilyanaing ham is ill with a stab wound to the stomach. eight—year—old miley described as a little angel stabbed to death at the weekend. tributes lay outside the bungalow in the area near walsall, it's where police were called to after 9pm on saturday. miley was found inside with serious injuries. she was rushed to hospital but police say medics were unable to
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save her. she died a short time later. a couple of doors down, a neighbours are in shock. saturday night i didn't sleep. it's terrible. it's just... night i didn't sleep. it's terrible. it'sjust. .. nothing like this happens down here. a 54—year—old man was arrested yesterday on suspicion of attempted murder. the bbc understands he is bilyanaing ham, mylee's father. he was taken to hospital with a serious stab wound to his stomach isn't is said to be ina to his stomach isn't is said to be in a critical condition. at mylee's school the head teacher had this to say. we are all numb. we are all in shock. everyone at the school is completely devastated. mylee was dearly loved by us all, her smile lit up the room, in fact it never left her face, she was a fun—loving happy eight—year—old who had her whole life in front of her. she took a full part in school life,
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particularly enjoying singing and performing. she wasjust particularly enjoying singing and performing. she was just a lovely girl. our hearts go out to her family at this difficult time. police are treating what happened as a domestic incident and say they're not looking for anybody else. a postmortem examination is taking place today to try and work out the exact cause of mylee's death, the little angel whose short life ended ina tragic little angel whose short life ended in a tragic way. the head of the army says the government must invest more in the armed forces or risk falling behind potential enemies. in a speech later this afternoon, general sir nick carter will say britain can't afford to sit back while countries like russia improve their capabilities. his comments have been approved by the defence secretary gavin williamson — and come amid speculation that the military is to face more cuts. richard galpin reports. for three years now, the russian military has been asserting itself on the world stage.
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playing a key role, for example, in the syrian civil war. it has been spending heavily to develop sophisticated weapons, like missiles fired into syria from the caspian sea, a distance of almost 1,000 miles. now, the head of the british army, general sir nick carter, is claiming russia's growing capability including in cyber warfare is eclipsing britain's armed forces, which are potentially facing further deep cuts. in a speech later today, he is expected to say. if we go back to the planning round in 2012, when the army was reduced to 80,000, there was a promise made of an uplift to make sure that the army of 2020 was properly equipped and capable.
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and it seems to me that the government at the moment is threatening to reduce that. and i think that would be a big mistake. that fear of further budget cuts to the army and other services is probably what is driving today's announcement by the army chief. it is extremely unlikely british forces will confront russia alone. it would only be as part of nato, which has a military budget more than ten times that of the russians. there is no doubt russia has become more aggressive, these exercises, for example, held last year in the european part of the country. the government here insist that with commitments to nato, britain's security is not in doubt. we can now speak to the former british army commander colonel richard kemp, he is in our ipswich newsroom. one of the surprises is that he is
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able to say this having got clea ra nce able to say this having got clearance or perhaps encouragement from the defence secretary himself. well i believe we know that the current defence secretary also believes we should be increasing our defence spending and certainly not sustaining any more cuts. so there can be no doubt that the chief of the general staff, general carter, said this with the approval and agreement of the defence secretary. in terms of military, what does it mean to say that we are probably struggling if we face a threat from russia, at what level, what does that actually mean? well, we have, as our armed forces have invested very heavily in capabilities to deal with the enemies we have been fighting recently, which is predominantly in afghanistan and iraq and they‘ re predominantly in afghanistan and iraq and they're low tech enemies so we have diverted a — spent a large amount of resources on the technology needed to deal with them which means we have almost
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unavoidably not spent the money on more hi—tech capabilities being developed by other potential enemies, for example, russia and iran, and the gap is therefore widening. we need now, therefore, to address it, we need to forget the idea of further deep cuts which are being proposed and planned by the treasury, and actually reverse them and increase our expenditure.” don't think i ever heard the boss of the army or any of the armed forces saying we need less money, but in terms of what we were hearing in that report, what happened to our role within nato, surely this is for nato to worry about the strategic pressures put on by russia and whatever russia is playing at, it's notjust a british problem? . you are right there, of course britain is one of the two countries, the other being the us, that spends the most on its defences. the nato target is 2% of gdp to be spent on defence by every country. only britain and america achieve that really in the major economies, some
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other smaller countries do. but what we have to do, we have to be prepared to fight against potential enemies with the united states on the assumption some elements of nato may fight, some may not. we have seen the will of many european countries to fight or not to fight in recent years and i think that we can't really depend on them so we need to have our own capability and in addition to that it's important we asa in addition to that it's important we as a permanent member of the security council, we should lead the way, set an example, we can only encourage other members to meet their obligations if we do the same. when you talk about britain leading the way, aren't we beginning to punch above our weight, we are no longer the power that we used to be and we need to recognise that? well, we are not the power we used to be but we are still a significant power. we are a member of the permanent five nations of the un security council and that brings with it responsibilities which we have to discharge. one thing we
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shouldn't forget as well i think is that an armed force exists for two main purposes, one is to defeat our enemies and the other purpose is to deter our enemies. in other words, to show intent and capability of our forces which will deter people from carrying out attacks or aggressive action against us. that can only come with significant investment in defence and political will to use it. currently we are sending signals by cutting defences and by showing a reluctance, shall we say, to considering in combat that can only encourage enemies and make war more lakely. thank you so much for your time. —— more likely. the headlines. henry bolton faces a wave of resignations from key positions as pressure mounts on him to quit. the head of the army warns that britain is struggling to keep up that britain is struggling to keep up with russia's military and needs more money, not more cuts. nhs trufss in england might have to
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recalculate their farmhandance data after current figures may have lead to misleading conclusions —— performance. in sport, celebrating the life ofjimmy arnfield who has died at the age of 82. his former teammate has paid tribute describing him as one of the most honest and jn even gentleman he had the good fortune to meet —— gentleman. michael o'neill has turned down the opportunity to replace gordon strachan as scotland manager. he says he doesn't feel it's the right opportunity for him at this moment in his career. a shock exit for novak djokovic from the australian open. he the world economic forum taking place in davos, in switzerland —
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and we're just hearing that the international monetary fund has upgraded its forecast for the world's economy — predicting growth will accelerate this year by nearly 4%. all signs point to a continuous strengthening of that growth this yearin strengthening of that growth this year in 2018 and next year in 2019. so this is very welcome news. and being here and having arrived to the media centre in the middle of the snow, we might all think of the words by william blake in the winter enjoy. but we believe that this would be a mistake and that complacency is actually one of the risks that we should guard against. we certainly should feel encouraged
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by the strengthened growth but we should not feel satisfied. now why is that? first of all, there are still too many people who are left out of that recovery and acceleration of growth. in fact, about one fifth of emerging and developing countries saw their per capita income decline in 2017. second reason why we should not feel entirely satisfied is that this is clearly a cyclic, mostly a cyclic recovery, and absent continuous reforms, the fundamental forces that had us so much worried about this new mediocre that we feared, in other words, the scars from the crisis, the low productivity, the ageing population, and on and on,
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and future potential growth, all of that will continue to weigh on medium term prospects. that was christine lagarde. we are getting verdicts from the winchester crown court. we are hearing that two men have been found guilty of murder and a number of other charges. let's go to our correspondent. this was a shocking case at the time. very much so. in the words of the prosecution and the police, this was an absolutely terrible crime. it did happen in april last year. guy hedger was at home with his husband simon ina hedger was at home with his husband simon in a wealthy part of the suburbs of bournemouth, if you like, a couple of miles outside bournemouth, it was 3am in the morning, two masked men burst into
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their bedroom and demanded jewellery and watches and anything else they had. at that point simon hedger, guy's partner/husband, had. at that point simon hedger, guy's pa rtner/husband, took had. at that point simon hedger, guy's partner/husband, took the two men into another room, saw a panic button, pressed it, that set off an alarm, a loud alarm, at that point guy hedger was shot. he died a couple of hours later. just in the past couple of minutes the jury here have found two men guilty of that murder. guy hedger was a highly accomplished businessman, he worked for a company lv in bournemouth, he was an award—winning director of that company. but he was more than that, he was also a great educationalist, in his spare time and for free he was part of something called the avon bourne education trust and he would give
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time to help school get better and educate children. he would bring his financial expertise and his marketing expertise to that educational trust all because he passionately believed in education. on that night in april of last year in the middle of the night which is why the police and why the prosecution have described this as such a terrifying crime, he lost his life when he was shot in his own bedroom. the two men got away with about £120,000 worth of watches and jewellery, much of which was recovered later. today they've been made to pay for their crimes with guilty verdicts, unanimous verdicts, at winchester crown court. thank you. our correspondentjane o'brien is in washington. the first working day of the week, or not for many. indeed. it's not at all. a lot of government employees have been told to stay at home or come in to find out whether they are
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essential or non—essential workers. either way, they're not being paid. we are going to find out in the next couple of hours whether the senate can break the deadlock, pass a measure that will fund the government for another three weeks so we could be back here again shortly. and whether or not the compromises reached over immigration, because this is what this is all about. whether or not the congress can give protection to children who were brought here illegally and were protected under the obama administration. that's all very much up in the air at the moment. we don't know which way it's going to go. there is certainly enough blame to go around. the republicans are blaming the democrats, the democrats the republicans and everyone seems to be displeased with donald trump. but the growing perception among ordinary americans, americans who will be affected by this is that congress is really struggling to run a one—carfuneral. thank you very much.
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nhs england has been asked to explain changes to the way hospitals calculate their figures for accident and emergency treatment times. the uk statistics authority says the alterations could have left people reaching misleading conclusions. faye kirkland is a freelance health reporter who also works as a gp. this misleading conclusions, cutting to the heart of it, things are worse than we think they are? that's one possibility, it's what the royal couege possibility, it's what the royal college of emergency medicine is worried about, this is about transparency of data really. so for yea rs transparency of data really. so for years hospitals have calculated how many patients are seen in the four—hour target, they may have included the main hospital a&e, so major trauma centre and walk—in centres if the trust run it or they happen to be on the same grounds as the hospital. even if they weren't nhs walk—in centres? the hospital. even if they weren't nhs walk-in centres? on the same grounds they could. that was according to guidance from nhs england which has been around since 2015, it's very clear, but the bbc
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has seen two e—mails, from nhs improvement, another nhs body, suggesting to trusts performance wasn't as good as it would like to the end of september, early october. gave trusts what they would say was a green light to add in walk—in centres they don't run and are not on the hospital grounds. so, for example, trusts added in walk—in centres miles away run by private providers. that's in conflict to guidance? and the department of health are saying trusts should be calculating reporting the data as nhs england has said. ok. we are talking about targets, talking about figures, talking about statistics. people on the front line are going to say the last thing we need is to have to go back and do this again, is that going to have to happen? that's something nhs england and nhs improvement are going to have to consider. the stats regulator want people to have confidence in the data, they want it to be transparent. if changes have been made the public should be able to see that because if you are looking
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at your local hospital, there is a question whether the data from october onwards is comparable to last yea r‘s october onwards is comparable to last year's october and for some trusts, you won't be able to compare year on year. in terms of what happens next, we are going to get new figures when? we don't know. we are waiting for nhs improvement to respond. it could be a while. could bea respond. it could be a while. could be a while. with everything else they're dealing with. great to talk to you, thank you. he denies murder and attempted murder, our home affairs correspondent has following the case. thejury were case. the jury were told that he is facing charges of the murder and attempted murder of other people. the prosecution counsel said that the defendants deliberately drove a heavy van into a group of muslims on the early hours of 19thjune and
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that the prosecution says the defendant was trying to kill as many of the group as possible. in the event he killed one person, a 51—year—old man and his family were in court today. he injured many others. the prosecution asked the jury others. the prosecution asked the jury why would someone do such a wicked thing and the prosecution says that there is an easy answer to that question because darren osbourne had left a note which was found in the van and the note read, why are there terrorists on our streets today, we have had three recent terror attacks, our children splattered against walls of concerts, and the prosecution say that darren osbourne had become obsessed also with events in rochdale where muslim men were accused of abusing young women. he wrote in the note, don't people get it, this is happening up ap down our green and pleasant land. it is the prosecution's case this was a terrorist attack, designed to intimidate the muslim community. the case is expected to last about two weeks.
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let's look at the weather. there is a lot of water around and some rain coming. this is leek in staffordshi re some rain coming. this is leek in staffordshire and parts of scotland have seen 22 centimetres, there is 11 centimetres in northern ireland and even in northern england, you can see it is starting to ease off now. but we love a contrast here! that is a contrast! yesterday glasgow and newcastle barely got above freezing. plymouth was 12 celsius. by this time tomorrow everywhere will be in double figures so the cold spell will be just a memory. i was actually in plymouth yesterday, i drove back last night and the rain has been horrendous and i know they have had flooding. with this milder air, it is also a sign
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of atla ntic this milder air, it is also a sign of atlantic fronts coming our way so what i give with one hand i take away with the other! but there is a milderaircoming up we away with the other! but there is a milder air coming up we had was that cold airand milder air coming up we had was that cold air and these orange and yellow colours are pushing infamy southwest which will be given us some sunshine and many have had a decent day. a slight difference, to the west there is more in the way of cloud and there have been some showers in scotland and northern england which will fade and temperatures are up quite a bit compared to recently. this evening is very quiet, a few icy stretches in scotland and north east england, then mainly dry before the next spell of wet weather comes in at the night wears on. much milder, 3—9dc, buta more in at the night wears on. much milder, 3—9dc, but a more unsettled day tomorrow. strengthening women's, outbreaks of rain —— strengthening winds. this is at rush hour,
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northern and western scotland with heavy and persistent rain but mild, gusty winds on the western coast and the rain will clear from gusty winds on the western coast and the rain will clearfrom northern ireland with more coming in the afternoon. a lot of cloud everywhere, some of that giving some misty conditions, but at this stage it is quite wet in east anglia and london and along the m4 corridor and toward southwest england where it will be starting to clear but there will be starting to clear but there will be starting to clear but there will be a lot of cloud. but that will be a lot of cloud. but that will thin and break, we will all have some rain but not all the time. sunny spells, before another showery band pushes eastward through the afternoon. quite windy but it is coming from the west or south west. highs of 10—13dc. in parts of wales and western england, maybe even the 14th or 15th but we then have our next system on tuesday night into wednesday, there will be gales likely and some heavy rain as well which will continue to move south
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east on wednesday. behind it some sunshine and showers, temperatures dropping away again. by the end of the week, it will be windy, particularly on thursday before that dies down on friday, a mixture of sunshine and showers, not as cold as it has been but turning a bit cold again. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the leader of ukip, henry bolton, is facing growing pressure to stand down after five members of the party's front bench gave up their party posts over his refusal to quit. those within the party say they've
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made a number of mistakes recently. there's a call on nhs england to explain changes to the recording of a&e data, after fears it could have left people reaching "misleading conclusions". the head of the army warns that the military may struggle to respond to future threats without further investment. a former conservative treasury minister says economic growth in britain is likely to be better than predicted this year. two men have been proud guilty of the murder of businessmen guy hedger who was shot dead during a botched burglary in his million pound home. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. michael o'neill has turned down the scotla nd michael o'neill has turned down the scotland job, why has he done that? that is the question, and i suppose he had been believed to be very
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close to taking over as scotland boss after talks just last week with the scottish football association in which they agreed to a compensation payment of £500,000 to the irish fa to secure his services but today there was a statement from him to say that he will remain in charge in belfast. he described it as a huge honour but just honour butjust not the right opportunity at this moment. since northern ireland went to the euros, getting to the last 16 in 2016, and the world cup play—offs recently, northern ireland will be very happy to keep him and you can see white scotla nd to keep him and you can see white scotland would be interested but their search for a new manager continues. and i heard about jimmy armfield this morning, there are some people who just enter your lives and whose voice you know and you feel you get to know them and he was one of those. what have people been saying? really sad news today and what people describing him as
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the voice of football. this was a man who is enshrined in the footballing history of this country, playing a club record 627 times for blackpool and he was part of the 19 thing the six —— 1966 world cup winning squad for england and such a familiar voice here at the bbc for over a0 it and among the tributes, former team—mate sir bobby charlton who described him as one of the most honest and genuine gentleman he had the good fortune to meet. we can get more reaction now. jimmy armfield rose to prominence in black and white, but he would go on to carve the most colourful of careers. born in denton in 1935, he was perhaps destined for the field. jimmy armfield moving up and it has hit the post! i always had a tennis ball in my pocket and i would push it along the street and play with it and that's howl
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along the street and play with it and that's how i learned to become a footballer. one club players have a lwa ys footballer. one club players have always been rare butjimmy armfield was one, a record 627 games for blackpool, many as captain over a 17 year period as a dashing right back. it is why they have since named a stand after him, put up a statue in his honour. he was loyal and loved. he won a3 caps for england. his honour. he was loyal and loved. he won 43 caps for england. jimmy armfield with a perfect interception. 15 as captain and he was part of the 1966 world cup winning squad, with only injury preventing him from playing in the tournament. to say you're not playing in the next warm—ups comey got to be fit for the world cup start. and i never played again. it is better that we won, today people look back and they say, remember the world cup squad, but it's not the same as being in the 11 who were in the final. but it is better that they won. later he turned his hand
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to management, guiding leeds united to management, guiding leeds united to the 1975 european cup final. he also spent the best part of a0 years asa also spent the best part of a0 years as a summariser for the bbc, becoming known to many as the voice of football. in a statement, his family said, "jimmy passed away peacefully after a decade long battle with cancer. " the flow of tributes are putting reflection of one of the greats of english football. jimmy armfield, who has died at the age of 82. there has been a major shock at the australian open debates with six time champion novak djokovic out. 21—year—old young chung has beaten him in a straight set and has become the first korean player to reach a grandson got the final —— hyeon chung. i'm disappointed copy no back because he is my idol! —— novak
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djokovic. i can't believe this, dreams come true tonight. he was a better player on the court tonight. he deserved to win, no question about it. whenever he was in trouble he came up with some unbelievable shots and from the back of the court he was like a wall of its impressive andl he was like a wall of its impressive and i wish him all the best. in cricket, a spectacular catch in the australian big bash league from melbourne renegade against the adelaide strikers force west indian dwayne bravo with a big hit in the outfield only for ben lockley to somehow catch the ball before he toppled over the boundary, throwing it away before jake wetherall completed a quite brilliant piece of fielding. amazing, supposedly the best catch in cricketing history. what do you think? i agree! we are
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keeping an eye on what is happening with ukip because it is changing by the moment. on twitter is from peter whittle who stood as they candidate for london mayor in 2016. that is his announcement. if you want a wider idea about how much trouble ukip are in, this is from christopher hope of the daily telegraph who has put up that hash tag. he has listed all the resignations in the past 2a hours. we are
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expecting a statement from the current leader of ukip at around 6pm, it was meant to be apm but it has been pushed back. he is a p pa re ntly has been pushed back. he is apparently at a hotel in folkestone but we be hearing from him later but sober resisting all of these calls to stand down —— so far resisting. you are watching afternoon live. a manufacturing firm that makes ejector seats has admitted breaching a health & safety law over the death of a red arrows pilot. flight lieutenant sean cunningham died in 2011 after being accidentally ejected from his plane. danny savage has the latest from lincoln crown court. sean cunningham was 35 years old. he was a fastjet pilot with the raf. he had flown tornadoes and seen action in iraq but his dream as a boy was to become a red arrows pilot. described as an absolute gentleman, he achieved his goal but was tragically killed as he prepared for a training flight back in 2011. now the manufacturers of the ejector seat have pleaded guilty
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to breaching health and safety laws. this is the red arrows hawkjet that sean cunningham was ejected from. the ejection seat was unintentionally triggered as he carried out his pre—flight checks. it went off while the plane was stationary on the ground. but this was a double tragedy. not only did flight lieutenant cunningham's seat eject him from his plane, but the parachute attached to it failed to deploy. it should have saved his life. instead, he crashed back to the ground, still strapped into the seat. he died from his injuries. the red arrows are based here at raf scampton in lincolnshire. this is where flight lieutenant sean cunningham was fatally injured back in november 2011. his inquest heard an over—tightened nut and bolt on his ejector seat stopped the parachute from working properly. the manufacturers of that seat, martin—baker, knew about the issue and told some air forces, but not the ministry of defence. so the engineers here were unaware of the issue. sean cunningham's sister, mother and father were at lincoln crown court today to hear the guilty plea from martin—baker.
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this has been a long ordeal for them. we welcome the conclusion of the coroner, which confirmed what we knew all along. which is that sean was blameless and his tragic death... excuse me... come on. his tragic death was preventable. a director of martin—baker, john martin, seen here second from left, admitted the health and safety charge on behalf of the company. but martin—ba ker continues to work with the red arrows and the rest of the raf, as they make all the ejector seats for fast jets. martin—ba ker have expressed their deepest condolences to the family and friends of sean cunningham
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in a statement today. they will face a sentencing hearing next month. the latest on the red arrows case. one in three young women in the uk are avoiding smear tests for cervical cancer, because they're embarrassed to show their bodies to doctors, according to a health charity. jo's cervical cancer trust, which surveyed more than 2000 women, said cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women under 35, yet the majority of those questioned didn't know they were most at risk. here's our health correspondent michelle roberts. a smear test can help find abnormal cells before they turn into cancer but of the 5 million women in the uk in by tip for screening each year, one in the four do not attend. —— invited for screening. we need more information about what it is. being under 25, i don't get told anything
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about it. it put you off going when you got your letter? it did, i was a bit worried, what was it about and ifi bit worried, what was it about and if i really had to do it sol haven't done it but probably i have to. i did for a while, until you have too, like, go for it. it's helpful if you have a friend who can come with you maybe and sit with you and stuff for the survey by temporary maghera found one in three of young women aged 25 to 35 were embarrassed to attend tests and one third said they would not go if they had not waxed their bikini area. when reality tv starjade goody died of cervical cancer in 2009, expert women turned up for tests. nearly a decade on, the number of screenings has hit a 20 year low and experts are worried for the virtually all of my patients seem to apologise to me
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feel the need to apologise, i'm really sorry i haven't waxed my legs, i have not shaved, i had a shower yesterday in third of this and my answer is always the same but i'm here to do a job and not think about that, and that's that. it is the chief executive ofjo's cervical cancer trust and he says body image issues could be putting lives in danger. cervical cancer is largely preve nta ble, danger. cervical cancer is largely preventable, smear tests prevents only 5%. if women are being put up attending screenings, there is a real risk that more women are being diagnosed and could lose their lives. women are of test every three yea rs on lives. women are of test every three years on the nhs and those between the ages of 50 years and 60 for every five years. if unchecked can save lives. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. ukip leader henry bolton faces a
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wave of resignations from key positions as pressure mounts on him to quit. the head of the army warns that britain is struggling to keep up with russia's military and needs more money, not more cuts. nhs trusts in england might have to recalculate their a&e performance data after current figures may have lead to "misleading conclusions". here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the ire of drops its forecast for the uk economic growth this year to 1.5% as it raises the forecast for the global economy as a whole to just under a%. others beg to differ. lord o'neill said that the uk economy would be better than anybody has been expecting and he is a former treasury minister and a remain supporter. len mccluskey, general secretary of the union chapel exactly unite, has had what
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he has caught encouraging talks with the head of peugeot. peugeot has announced 650 job cuts at vauxhall‘s ellesmere port plant. mr mcclusky said mr tavares talked of "working with unite to construct monday is the first day of work for many but not the us government. not com pletely many but not the us government. not completely of course, essential services keep going, some debate about whether the statue of liberty will stay open but it looks like it will stay open but it looks like it will do and be financed by the mayor of new york, or they are thinking about it. most government services have been closed down. there is no official tally but the last time this happened was in 2013 and about 800,000 people were involved and the biggest effect actually local economies. places like norfolk, virginia where you have the pentagon and the rest, that side of thing can affect them quite badly. politically they are blaming each other, but the
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imf are meeting in davos. anybody who is anybody is there. but a positive outlook, notjust globally including here? 120 countries, the imf has raised its growth forecast for 120 countries but unfortunately we are not one of them. america is come up to 2.7%, they were saying 2.3% in october but now 2.7%. the uk they are saying is 1.5% growth this year. do they get their figures right? not always but which forecast does? it is a collection of a previous forecast. and you can play around with these for ever. it is the weight of the number of countries that is seeing this growth, it cannot be denied that growth, it cannot be denied that growth is pretty strong in europe
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and in emerging markets and in asia. not so much africa, south africa is a real problem at the moment with bad figures coming from their all—star spain is a bit bad. but generally speaking a strong set of numbers. samira hussain is in new york at the stock exchange. very encouraging figures for america and it seems to justify a lot of what mr trump has been saying about the effect of the tax reforms? what i find interesting, but we are seeing from the imf is similar to what we have been hearing domestic league with regards to tax reform. no doubt that tax reform is going to be a boost in the short —— domestically. that is what the imf is reflecting. we are seeing that tax break that corporations have received, some have already made big announcement about how they are reinvesting that into the us but fast forward a few
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years and it is unclearjust how beneficial the tax reform will actually be domestic league here in the us. there is concern about how this will impact the middle class and that is also being reflected in the imf. in the short term there will be a lot more growth but looking forward in 2020 there is a lot more uncertainty when it comes to that which i think is something we have been hearing domestic league —— domestically as well. we have been hearing domestic league -- domestically as well. and did you notice the government shutdown every day, does it have a big effect on you personally or on the market generally? it has not had much of an impact on the markets exactly because they are pretty much shrugging it off because we have seen it before. back in 2013 we had a shutdown. where you will see a big impact on the us economy is depending on how long the shutdown
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actually lasts. if it is only a couple of weeks it's not that big a deal but if it goes on longer than you are going to see an impact on the us economy. in fact, the last shutdown in 2013 shaved off 0.3% on the us overall gdp. thank you very much. hang on, you pushed that woman out of the way! i gently nudged her, simon! it was gentle! it did not look like a nudge from here! thank you very much for that. let's have a look at the markets. the ftse is down a little bit, it could be those growth figures but not much of a change. the pound is looking quite strong against the euro. the german and french market is up and touch. and quickly, looking at the standard edited by george osborne, they say
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that surging world growth will leave brexit britain trailing. they are mentioned brexit, always in these economic reports, and they say is going to be a drag on the uk economy and that is why they have been confidently marking down the growth but it has to be said, 1.5%, the uk has an enormous advantage in that it has an enormous advantage in that it has had a devaluation at a time when the rest of the global economy is growing. bizarrely, it is complete coincidence, you could pinpoint the start of the global economic growth almost to the referendum, a strange coincidence. as the pound has devalued, the rest of the global economy began to take off and as a result we could capitalise on that growth because we have a devaluation and could export to the rest of the world. it has worked well but still only producing something like 1.5% growth. we have two royal weddings coming! i can't wait!
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we brought you this news earlier. princess eugenie has become engaged to her long—term boyfriend, jack brooksbank. there are official engagement photographs and here they are. they we re photographs and here they are. they were taken at buckingham palace. that is the ring. it is a pink oval sapphire. it means nothing to me because i can't afford one! it is surrounded by diamonds on a gold band. it is the rarest of all sapphires and normally comes from sri lanka. there you are! her father, the jadhav york, has been giving his reaction to the news. —— with the duke of york. i am absolutely overjoyed, i'm thrilled. jack is an absolutely outstanding young man and eugenie and he have got to know each other over a number of years and i'm really thrilled for them. i know that, i cannot speak for the duchess, but for beatrice,
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we are overjoyed at the news today that eugenie and jack have got engaged. looking forward to the wedding? yes, it's now about finding the time and the date and getting it all organised. i think probably in the autumn sometime will be the sort of time everybody is looking at. but we can't fix a date yet, we've got to look at everybody‘s diaries. it is a bit more complicated than that! but today, it's their day and i'm just completely overjoyed for them and wish them every happiness. you know you're getting old when you remember standing outside a hospital doorfor the birth of remember standing outside a hospital door for the birth of princess eugenie and you hear she is now getting married for the enough about me! let's have a look at the weather. the trend to something my other is
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underway, still a lot of lying snow across northern ireland, scotland and northern england and that will be starting to thaw in the coming days. some interesting temperature contrasts. yesterday some places struggled to get above freezing while the milder air was already arriving in the south—west but by tomorrow most of us will be in double figures and some parts of wales and west england could go up to 15 celsius because we have lost that cold air and the winds have changed direction, pushing my other air into the country. a quiet evening, still some icy stretches in the far north of scotland and north east england. dry for many at first but later in the night the next wet and windy weather comes into the west. milder, 3—9dc, but more u nsettled west. milder, 3—9dc, but more unsettled day tomorrow. strengthening winds, outbreaks of rain on and off the day. this is 8am, wet start in western and northern parts of scotland, heavy
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persistent rain coupled with a strengthening wind but look at the temperatures, very mild. that rain clearing from northern ireland, more likely to come through the afternoon. a lot of mist and low cloud around and some poor visibility in places. the rain will be in north—east england and east anglia, across the ma corridor. as it clears, still quite a bit of cloud and mist and fog and some strong winds on the western coasts. at some stage we will all see some rain but not all the time. as it clears that should be some good spells of sunshine for a time and some more showery rain pushing eastward through the afternoon. quite windy but much milder with highs between 10—13dc. some parts of wales and west of england could reach 1a or 15. very unsettled tuesday night into wednesday, you can see these isobars, that will bring gales and another spell of rain which will continue to move
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south—eastward on wednesday. quite u nsettled south—eastward on wednesday. quite unsettled midweek and behind it those temperatures start to drop a little, 12 or 13 in the south can pay to seven or eight further north. still quite windy at the end of the week but it will ease on friday, sunshine and showers and feeling a bit colder. hello, you're watching afternoon live. leader henry bolton face as wave of resignations from key positions as pressure mounts on him to quit. i am not making any comment. he's saying nothing at the moment but is making a statement in an hour. the head of the army warns that britain is struggling to keep up with russia's military and needs more money, not more cuts. two men have been found guilty of the murder of businessman guy hedger who was shot dead during a botched burglary at his million pound home. an ejector seat manufacturer has admitted breaching health and safety law over the death of a red arrows pilot in 2011. coming up all the sport. we will of course have more reaction to the death of former england and
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blackpool captain jimmy armfield who has died at the age of 82. scotland's search for a manager continues with michael o'neill‘s decision to stay put. more on that later. and with a full look at the weather alina. and this may be the last time for a while that we talk about snow because things are turning milder over the next few days but with that milderair over the next few days but with that milder air comes something wetter and windier. all the details later. also coming up, what could be better than one royal wedding in one year? well, two of course. buckingham palace announces prince andrew's daughter princess eugenie is getting married. she will get married in the autumn. hello everyone, this is afternoon live.
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pressure is continuing to mount on the ukip leader henry bolton after a string of resignations of senior members this morning. the party's assistant deputy leader, and its immigration, trade, education, and local government spokesmen have all quit, joining the deputy leader margot parker, who resigned last night. they've all stood down in protest at henry bolton's refusal to quit as leader — following a string of revelations about his private life — even though the party executive backed a vote of no confidence in him. our political correspondent alex forysth, reports. i'm not making any comment. despite growing pressure, he says he's not going anywhere, henry bolton insisting he wants to keep leading ukip, even though the ruling body says he should quit and now, a string of senior members have resigned because he will not go. including margot parker, who stepped down as deputy leader, mike hookem has quit as assistant deputy, tim aker, as local government spokesman, david curtin, as front man for education, william dartmouth has given up his job as trade spokesman, and john bickley has walked away
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from his role with immigration. if he hangs around politics, given what has happened and the nature of everything that has happened, it will not be good for him or everyone he is with. my advice would be, look, henry, we don't want to keep arguing with you and causing you any more trouble, why don't you just go and sort out your personal life. it is over his relationship with 25—year—old jo marney, he says it is over after she had to apologise for sending racist text messages, that has not appeased critics. after being elected only four months ago, promising to restore unity, his position risks tearing the party apart. this is where ukip has marked some of its big moments, outside europe house, a key eu base in london, but after its success in the brexit referendum, ukip lost direction and has been plagued by bitter infighting, with four leaders in just over a year, prompting some to ask whether now anyone can lead this party back from the brink. the party chairman today insisted
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ukip still has a role in representing those who backed brexit. that is why ukip are so important and why we must stay on the field of play, get our house in order and do it quickly, but once we have, we have a purpose. and those 17.a million voters are it. even those embroiled in the leadership crisis recognise how damaging it is for the for the beleaguered party. our correspondent leila nathoo is in folkestone where the ukip leader is due to speak in the next hour or so. what do we expect him to say? well, all the indications are that henry bolton will refuse to stand down. he has been adamant that he won't move from his position, despite all the allegations and despite the wave of resignations from senior people in his party. he hasn't spoken since
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the ruling body voted last night in a vote of no confidence against him but the indications are when he speaks here in the next hour that he is going to resist those calls to stand down. looking at the scene behind you, there is a hell of a storm brewing by the look of it, if ever that was true of the political world, he will know about that as well. absolutely. it seems all too familiara well. absolutely. it seems all too familiar a story, talking about the potential end of ukip, talking about internal splits, talking about internal splits, talking about internal strive and conflict in the party. henry bolton is already the third leader since, third new leader since nigel farage quit after the brexit referendum last year. diane james, nigel farage's immediate successor lasted weeks, paul nuttall only lasted — failed to get elected in two parliamentary seats, and then henry bolton only in the job since september and already talk of him
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standing down after allegations of racist text messages sent by his girlfriend, his ex—girlfriend now, who he says he has ended that relationship with. he is under a lot of pressure but his point of view is ukip cannot afford politically or financially another leadership election and he thinks the whole episode is a distraction and the pa rty‘s episode is a distraction and the party's ruling body shouldn't be preoccupied with his personal life and the party needs to get on with putting over its core message, focussing again on brexit, trying to get the best brexit deal as they say, but again this episode has underlined the existential crisis facing ukip since the brexit vote, since their reason for being was actually — had gone away, since the result of the brexit vote, and since nigel farage had relinquished that leadership. we will hear possibly a defiant tone again from henry bolton in the next hour by i don't think that's going to stop questions. there is another month going now until the ukip there is another month going now
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untilthe ukip nec there is another month going now until the ukip nec meeting that ta kes until the ukip nec meeting that takes place, the emergency general meeting that takes place of the party members, henry bolton believes he has the support of enough members who can keep him in place. we will be back to you later, thank you. the head of the army says the government must invest more in the armed forces or risk falling behind potential enemies. in a speech later this afternoon, general sir nick carter will say britain can't afford to sit back while countries like russia improve their capabilities. his comments have been approved by the defence secretary gavin williamson and come amid speculation that the military is to face more cuts. richard galpin reports. for three years now, the russian military has been asserting itself on the world stage. playing a key role, for example, in the syrian civil war. it has been spending heavily to develop sophisticated weapons, like these missiles fired into syria from the caspian sea, a distance of almost 1,000 miles.
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now, the head of the british army, general sir nick carter, is claiming russia's growing capability including in cyber warfare is eclipsing britain's armed forces, which are potentially facing further deep cuts. in a speech later today, he is expected to say. if we go back to the planning round in 2012, when the army was reduced to 80,000, there was a promise made of an uplift to make sure that the army of 2020 was properly equipped and capable. and it seems to me that the government at the moment is threatening to reduce that. and i think that would be a big mistake. that fear of further budget cuts to the army and other services is probably what is driving today's announcement by the army chief. it is extremely unlikely british
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forces will confront russia alone. it would only be as part of nato, which has a military budget more than ten times that of the russians. there is no doubt russia has become more aggressive, these exercises, for example, held last year in the european part of the country. the government here insist that with commitments to nato, britain's security is not in doubt. two men have been found guilty of murdering a businessman in an attempted burglary at his home in hampshire. guy hedger was shot dead last april by kevin downton and jason baccus, who committed burglaries to fund their drug habits. a third man, scott keeping, was acquitted. what's the background to this?
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what's the background to thi57m all happened in april of last year, simon. guy hedger, a well—known and wealthy successful businessman in the bournemouth area was at home with his husband, simon. they were in bed, it was 3am in the morning when this happened. two miss masked men came into that bedroom carrying a shotgun. it seemed as though guy hedger couldn't remember the codes to the safe that the men were demanding to simon took the men to another room, as he did so, he saw a panic button on the wall that had been installed by previous owners of that house, instinctively he hit that house, instinctively he hit that panic button and a huge alarm was set off. at that point guy hedger was shot in the chest. he died a couple of hours later. the two masked men made off with something like £120,000 worth of jewellery and watches and one of them even returned to the house to ta ke them even returned to the house to take a mobile phone and a landline
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phone so simon hedger couldn't phone the police and couldn't phone the ambulance, something that the prosecution said was a very callous act indeed. the two men were kevin downen to and jason baccus. soon after that they found a cigarette butt near the house that had jason ba ccus butt near the house that had jason baccus dna on it and residue that matched the gunshot residue on guy hedger himself, so a complicated investigation for the police. simon hedger, whose witness statement is being read out in the court was devastated by this, not only at the loss of his husband, but also because of the fact that guy hedger wasn't just a businessman, because of the fact that guy hedger wasn'tjust a businessman, he was a man who was absolutely devoted to
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education. in his spare time he freely gave himself to a local education trust in the bournemouth area. he helped with their marketing and finances because he had this love of educating children. his husband has expressed his devastation at the loss of guy hedger, but also so too today that educational trust have said they have great regrets about this case because guy hedger to them was a kind, gentle caring man, who lived for these children. do we know why the two targeted guy hedger? we don't. kevin downton and jason baccus were career burglars but we have no idea, because they denied all charges, as to why they targeted the house on that night. earlier in the evening they had driving around in the area, but for some reason they left that area, went toburgle a commercial property,
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that same evening, got away with a few things there, and came back to guy hedger‘s house, but to do so they had to pass through many other very expensive looking houses in this suburb of the bournemouth area. we don't know why, the police don't know why that particular house was targeted. nor do we know why they we re targeted. nor do we know why they were carrying a gun. both these men we re were carrying a gun. both these men were career criminals but only house burglaries and commercial burglaries, no history whatsoever of violence or carrying a gun. that's the mystery to the police and at the moment we don't know why guy hedger was targeted in this way. thank you. the international monetary fund has upgraded its forecasts
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for the global economy. it now predicts growth will accelerate to just below four per cent this year and next. the imf says the pickup in growth has been broadly based, though it singles out asia and europe as having already done better than expected. the managing director of the imf christine lagarde gave more details, describing it as ‘welcome news‘ but warned countries should not be complacent over the outlook. all signs point to a continuous strengthening of that growth this year in 2018 and next year in 2019. so this is very welcome news. and being here and having arrived to the media centre in the middle of the snow, we might all think of the words by the words by william blake, in the winter, enjoy. but we believe that this would be a mistake and that complacency is actually one of the risks that we should guard against. we certainly should feel encouraged by the strengthened growth but we should not feel satisfied. now why is that? first of all, there are still too
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many people who are left out of that recovery and acceleration of growth. in fact, about one fifth of emerging and developing countries saw their per capita income decline in 2017. second reason why we should not feel entirely satisfied is that this is clearly a cyclical, mostly a cyclical recovery, and absent continuous reforms, the fundamental forces that had us so much worried about this new mediocre that we feared, in other words, the scars from the crisis, the low productivity, the ageing population, and on and on, and future potential growth, all of that will continue to weigh on medium term prospects. our economics editor has been
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talking to a former treasury minister about the campaign to remain in the eu, lord o'neill, who says we should also upgrade our economic forecasts, he says that the boost to exports from economic growth in our main trading partners is likely to dwarf any possible negative effects of brexit. this is what he had to say. i am almost embarrassed to accept it might sound like that, because of course in principle i share the views of many that brexit is like a really weird thing for the uk to impose on itself in an economic perspective, but i quickly add at the same time, i have felt for a good couple of years as important as brexit is, it isn't the most important thing facing britain's future. things like regional inequalities and underlying and related productivity problem are much bigger issues. do you think now
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with this global growth, with this possibility of productivity being better, british economy is going to do far better than you expected a year—and—a—half ago?” do far better than you expected a year-and-a-half ago? i certainly wouldn't have thought the uk economy wouldn't have thought the uk economy would be as robust as it currently seems. but that is because it looks to me like some parts of the country, led by the north—west, are actually doing better than people seem to realise or appreciate. as well as this crucial fact the rest of the world is doing way better than many people would have thought a year ago. so it makes it easier for the uk. now whether that — if this turns out to be borne out with more data in the coming months, the brexiteers are going to be like the cat with cream, there you go, told you so. which of course is ridiculous. that was lord o'neill. let's go to my colleague in davos in switzerland where that economic forum is taking place. the bottom
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line is that the global economies are doing fantastically well, britain would be doing better if it wasn't for brexit, is that a fair summation? well, that is what lord 0'neill summation? well, that is what lord o'neill was surmising when he was talking there, if you listen to the full interview, he explains that he is quite surprised and embarrassed to say that he got his predictions wrong when it comes to how the uk economy would do last year and the year ahead. but his opinion is if it wasn't for brexit we could be doing a lot better. what's interesting when you look at what the international monetary fund had to say today about the global outlook, something they did say is they saw such surprising growth in europe. of course america is doing well and with the prospect of the impact of donald trump's tax reforms boosting america further, the thinking is that, coupled with good growth in china as well, means the global economy is going to have a good year
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and therefore the uk is going to benefit from that because of the uk's trade with all those areas and of course the biggest trading partner for the of course the biggest trading partnerfor the uk of course the biggest trading partner for the uk is of course the biggest trading partnerfor the uk is europe, so if europe is doing better than expected, exceptionally well, then the uk will benefit. i have to say, andi the uk will benefit. i have to say, and i think christine lagarde was saying this, let's not be complacent, let's not get ahead of ourselves here and be cosy about the outlook because there are still a lot of uncertainties out there and brexit remains a big uncertainty for the uk economy. for those looking to invest in the world right now, the uk is less likely to be on their radar than some of the other more exciting economies that have a better prospect. sally in davos, poor thing! thank you very much for that. the headlines. the head of the army warns that
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britain is struggling to keep up with russia's military capabilities and needs more money, not more cuts. two men have been consringd of the murder of businessman —— convicted of the murder of businessman guy hedger. coming up more wedding bells in windsor. prince andrew's daughter is said to get married in the autumn, months after her cousin prince harry. in sport, celebrating the life of former england and blackpool captain jimmy armfield who has died at the age of 82. sir bobby charlton has paid tribute describing him as one of the most honest and genuine gentleman he had the good fortune to meet. no move for michael o'neill just yet, he has turned down the opportunity to replace gordon strachan as scotland manager. he says he doesn't feel it's the right opportunity for him at the moment in his career. and a shock exit for
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novak djokovic from the australian open. he has been knocked out. i will be back at half past. a man accused of driving a van into a crowd of people near two mosques in north london wanted to kill as many muslims a possible, a court has heard at the opening of the trail. darren osborne is accused of deliberately driving a van into worshippers, killing one person. angus crawford is following the case. the prosecution has made it clear there are no terrorist offences on this indictment per se but they're clear, the prosecutor said this was an act of terrorism designed to influence government and intimidate the muslim community. darren osbourne has denied one count of murder and attempted murder. the
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prosecution continued, they say that in his attack he planned to kill as many people as possible. what happened? we were told that on 18th june last year he hired a van in cardiff. he drove it all the way to london. his initial target, thejury heard, was to be a march taking place that day but he couldn't get close. he drove around the area for hours until he came to finsbury park. there he saw a man who collapsed on the street, he was unwell, he had within —— he had been attended to by a group of men in muslim dress, they had been attending prayers. the prosecution say he swerved his van off the road, driving into mrali, killing him and injuring seriously several others. we will leave it there, thank you very much. nhs england has been asked to explain changes to the way hospitals calculate their figures for accident and emergency treatment times.
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the uk statistics authority says the alterations could have left people reaching misleading conclusions. faye kirkland is a freelance health reporter who also works as a gp. i asked her if things were worse than we thought? so for years hospitals have calculated how many patients are seen in the four—hour target, they may have included the main hospital a&e, so major trauma centre and walk—in centres if the trust run it or they happen to be on the same grounds as the hospital. even if they weren't nhs walk—in centres? on the same grounds they could. that was according to guidance from nhs england which has been around since 2015, it's very clear, but the bbc has seen two e—mails, from nhs improvement, another nhs body, suggesting to trusts performance wasn't as good as it would like to the end of september, early october. and gave trusts what they would say was a green light to add in walk—in centres they don't run and are not on the hospital grounds. so, for example, trusts added
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in walk—in centres miles away run by private providers, like virgin. that's in conflict to guidance? and the department of health are saying trusts should be calculating reporting the data as nhs england has said. we are talking about targets, talking about figures, talking about statistics. people on the front line are going to say the last thing we need is to have to go back and do this again, is that going to have to happen? that's something nhs england and nhs improvement are going to have to consider. the stats regulator want people to have confidence in the data, they want it to be transparent. if changes have been made the public should be able to see that because if you are looking at your local hospital, there is a question whether the data from october onwards is comparable to last year's october and for some trusts, you won't be able to compare year on year. in terms of what happens next, we are going to get new figures when? we don't know. we are waiting for nhs improvement to respond. as the working week begins
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in the united states, hundreds of thousands of employees will not be behind their desks, as federal government services are still shut down. senators held a rare sunday sitting yesterday, but delayed a vote on a budget measure, which would have allowed civil servants to go back to work. our correspondentjane o'brien is in washington. a lot of government employees have been told to stay at home or come in to find out whether they are essential or non—essential workers. either way, they're not being paid. we are going to find out in the next couple of hours whether the senate can break the deadlock, pass a measure that will fund the government for another three weeks so we could be back here again shortly. and whether or not the compromises reached over immigration, because this is what this is all about. whether or not the congress can give protection to children who were brought here illegally and were protected under the obama administration. that's all very much up in the air at the moment. we don't know which way it's going to go. there is certainly enough blame to go around.
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the republicans are blaming the democrats, the democrats the republicans and everyone seems to be displeased with donald trump. but the growing perception among ordinary americans, americans who will be affected by this, is that congress is really struggling to run a one—carfuneral. we brought you the breaking news earlier, princess eugenie is to we had her long—term boyfriend jack brooksbank. buckingham palace have now released their official engagement photographs. the ring is a pink oval padparadsha sap fire
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surrounded by diamonds. the duke of york has been giving his reaction. jack is an outstanding young man and eugenie have got to know each other over a number of years and i am really thrilled for them and i know that i can't speak for the duchess, but we — but we are overjoyed. looking forward to the wedding? yes, it's now about finding the time and the date and getting it all organised. i think probably in the autumn sometime will be the sort of time that everybody‘s looking at. we can't fix a date yet, we have to look at everybody‘s diaries. it's a bit more complicated than that. so, today it's their day, i am just com pletely today it's their day, i am just completely overjoyed for them and wish them every happiness. november is looking all right.
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let's look at the weather. hello. not a bad afternoon for many. spells of sunshine, showers slowly fading from scotland. quite quiet this evening and at first tonight, a few icy stretches for scotland. later in the night wet and windy weather arriving from the west but it will be a milder night. tomorrow looks to be more unsettled. strengthening winds, outbreaks of rain pushing eastwards, it won't be raining all the time but all of us will see some rain at some stage but also spells of sunshine as that rain sta rts also spells of sunshine as that rain starts to clear. a much milderfeel tomorrow, highs between 10 and 13. some places perhaps a degree or so higher across parts of wales, western parts of england. turns very u nsettled western parts of england. turns very unsettled tuesday and into wednesday. the next atlantic system pushing eastwards, gales, if not severe gales in places, and heavy rain sinking south east, that will
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continue through wednesday. quite an u nsettled continue through wednesday. quite an unsettled spell of weather mid week. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the leader of ukip, henry bolton, is facing growing pressure to stand down after five members of the party's front bench gave up their party posts over his refusal to quit. the head of the army warned that the military may struggle to respond to future threats without further investment. two men have been proud guilty of the murder of businessmen guy hedger who was shot dead during a botched burglary in his million pound home. there is a call for the head of nhs england to explain changes to the recording of a&e data after fears it could other people reaching his leading conclusions. a former conservative treasury ministers as economic growth in britain is likely to be better than predicted this year. princess eugenie is to marry her boyfriend, jack brooksbank.
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sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. and some sad news, the death of an england and blackpool legend. yes, jimmy armfield, a man who is enshrined in the footballing history of the country, playing a record 627 times for blackpool over the years and part of the england 1966 world cup winning squad and a familiar voice on the bbc for more than a0 yea rs. voice on the bbc for more than a0 years. many described him as the voice of football and some very emotional tributes as you would imagine, among them so geoff hurst who described him as one of the great fullbacks —— sir geoff hurst. anotherformer great fullbacks —— sir geoff hurst. another former team—mate, sir bobby charlton, described him as one of the most honest and genuine gentleman he had the good fortune to meet. but it is the stories that tell you what kind of a man he was, with one journalist describing a post match press conference when the manager got quite tetchy and asked
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the journalist, what have you won? and of course jimmy armfield the journalist, what have you won? and of coursejimmy armfield stood up and of coursejimmy armfield stood up and answered. just such a huge loss and that feeling echoed by so many. and staying with football, scotland are still looking for a manager? yes, there are a few relieved northern ireland fans, hearing the news that michael o'neill is staying put at windsor park for the time being having turned down the chance to ta ke being having turned down the chance to take over as scotland boss despite talks with the scottish pub association last week. he will remain in charge of northern ireland —— at scottish football association. our scottish football board is with us, this must be disappointing for the sfa? no doubt about it, extremely disappointing. they have been chasing michael o'neill as their preferred candidate since deciding not to renew the contract of gordon strachan back in october. they firmly believed he was the man
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who could end that long scotland wait for qualification to a major competition but today they put out a statement saying they respected the decision of michael o'neill and would go back to a list of candidates and take their time and make sure they got the right man. the problem is that he was seen as the only candidate for so long that it is strange to see that at this stage they do have a plan b. they will have to take their time to find the right man. as you mentioned, do they have a plan b? and given the upcoming schedule they will not be ina rush? upcoming schedule they will not be in a rush? they would never say they don't have a plan b, they say they have a list of candidates and they will go back to it. but you are right, they do have time on their side. they do not have a qualifying match until september so they can ta ke match until september so they can take as long as they like but it will be interesting to see exactly who. alex mcleish has been
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mentioned, steve clarke, manager of kilmarnock and also derek mcinnes who is boss of aberdeen but it will be interesting to see who they do turn to given that michael o'neill was such a strong favourite for so long. thank you. there has been a major shock at the australian open with six time champion novak djokovic being put out by the 21—year—old hyeon chung. it makes him the first korean in either the men's or women's game to reach a grand slam quarterfinal and he will now face tennys sandgren. when i'm young i am just trying to copy novak because he's my idol! i can't believe this, dreams come true tonight. and it seems greg rutherford will not be defending his long jump title at the commonwealth games if you're having pulled out of the team due to what he says is a
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lack of preparation. he clinched gold at glasgow four years ago but his decision to take some time away from athletics had left him feeling unable to sufficiently prepared to compete in australia in april. a00 metres hurdle runnerjacob paul has taken his place in the squad. we will have more sport in the next hour. a manufacturing firm that makes ejector seats has admitted breaching a health & safety law over the death of a red arrows pilot. flight lieutenant sean cunningham died in 2011 after being accidentally ejected from his plane. danny savage has the latest from lincoln crown court. sean cunningham was 35 years old. he was a fastjet pilot with the raf. he had flown tornadoes and seen action in iraq but his dream as a boy was to become a red arrows pilot. described as an absolute gentleman, he achieved his goal but was tragically killed as he prepared for a training flight back in 2011. now the manufacturers of the ejector
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seat have pleaded guilty to breaching health and safety laws. this is the red arrows hawkjet that sean cunningham was ejected from. the ejection seat was unintentionally triggered as he carried out his pre—flight checks. it went off while the plane was stationary on the ground. but this was a double tragedy. not only did flight lieutenant cunningham's seat eject him from his plane, but the parachute attached to it failed to deploy. it should have saved his life. instead, he crashed back to the ground, still strapped into the seat. he died from his injuries. the red arrows are based here at raf scampton in lincolnshire. this is where flight lieutenant sean cunningham was fatally injured back in november 2011. his inquest heard an over—tightened nut and bolt on his ejector seat stopped the parachute from working properly. the manufacturers of that seat, martin—baker, knew about the issue
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and told some air forces, but not the ministry of defence. so the engineers here were unaware of the issue. sean cunningham's sister, mother and father were at lincoln crown court today to hear the guilty plea from martin—baker. this has been a long ordeal for them. we welcome the conclusion of the coroner, which confirmed what we knew all along. which is that sean was blameless and his tragic death... excuse me... come on. his tragic death was preventable. a director of martin—baker, john martin, seen here second from left, admitted the health and safety charge on behalf of the company. but martin—ba ker continues to work with the red arrows and the rest of the raf, as they make all the ejector seats for fast jets. martin—ba ker have expressed their deepest condolences to the family and friends of sean cunningham
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in a statement today. they will face a sentencing hearing next month. one in three young women in the uk are avoiding smear tests for cervical cancer, because they're embarrassed to show their bodies to doctors, according to a health charity. jo's cervical cancer trust, which surveyed more than 2000 women, said cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women under 35, yet the majority of those questioned didn't know they were most at risk. here's our health correspondent, michelle roberts. a smear test can help find abnormal cells before they turn into cancer but of the 5 million women in the uk invited for screening each year, one in the four do not attend. we need a bit more education about what a smear test is. for me, being under 25, ijust don't get told anything about it. when you got your letter, you went, it didn't put you off going? it did, i was a bit worried, what was it about and if i
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really had to do it. so actually i haven't done it but probably i have to do it. i did for a while, until you have tojust, like, go for it. that's basically all there is to it. it's helpful if you have a friend who can come with you maybe and sit in the waiting area and stuff like that. the survey byjo's cervical cancer trust found one in three of young women aged 25 to 35 were embarrassed to attend smear tests. a third said they would not go for a smear if they had not waxed their bikini area. one in six would rather miss their smear test than a gym class. when reality tv starjade goody died of cervical cancer in 2009, extra women turned up for smear tests. nearly a decade on, the number of screenings has hit a 20—year low and experts are worried. virtually all of my patients seem to apologise to me or feel the need to apologise to me before we start. "i'm really sorry i haven't waxed my legs, i'm really sorry i didn't shave, i'm really sorry i had a shower yesterday instead of this morning."
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and my answer is always, i don't think about that, i'm here to do a job. we do the procedure or the examination or whatever it is and that's that. robert music is the chief executive of jo's cervical cancer trust and he says body image issues could be putting lives in danger. cervical cancer is largely preventable. smear tests prevent 75% of all cervical cancers. if women are being put off attending screenings, there is a real risk that more women will be diagnosed and potentially will lose their lives. women aged 25—a9 are offered tests every three years on the nhs and those between the ages of 50 and 6a every five years. getting checked can save lives. michelle roberts, bbc news. so is embarrassment a major factor stopping women from getting smear tests? our correspondent charlotte gallagher went out and about to ask women about their experiences. i think it's wrong to feel embarrassed because it's something that can have such a huge impact on your health and it's
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probably a scary procedure, i've actually never had one because i'm under 25. i just think we need a bit more education around the problems, not problems, but what a smear test is. because i know for me, being under 25, ijust don't get told anything about it and i think that's a big problem. i think i did for a while until one day you just kind of have to like, go for it, and that's basically all there is to it. it's helpful if you have a friend who can come with you maybe, sit in the waiting area and stuff like that. it would be a bit embarrassing but i don't think i would not go because of that. it's something you have to go, like, right, i'll go and do it. rosie schofield was diagnosed with cervical cancer last year and is currently training to be a nurse. shejoins me now. you were diagnosed last year. the red missed at least one appointment? —— you had missed. that's right. red missed at least one appointment? -- you had missed. that's right. and
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explain why. it is easier to cancel an appointment than to go through with it when you worried about what might happen? i think that is something there is a fear factor of the unknown. it's not something we talk about that often. there is that fear of the unknown. and it is so easy to cancel an appointment, a lot of people make them with good intentions and as it approaches, maybe they have things going on at home, they are busy orjust general anxiety about the appointment get in the way. it fed to say that most young women “— the way. it fed to say that most young women —— is it fair to say that most young women know what the procedure is that they don't know who is doing it, that is part of the fear and the embarrassment?” who is doing it, that is part of the fear and the embarrassment? i think thatis fear and the embarrassment? i think that is true. it is an important pa rt that is true. it is an important part of general practice, the nurse
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practitioner role in public health. it is something these practitioners do every day, it is just a normal procedure for them and they want women to come in and attend. but as the patient, you don't know that and there is a feeling of anxiety about it, about who might be doing the procedure. you don't necessarily have a relationship with the gp or practice nurse know who they are and there is that issue of shame. you area there is that issue of shame. you are a nurse, nurses and doctors are notoriously bad at looking after their own health. firstly, how are you? you their own health. firstly, how are you ? you were their own health. firstly, how are you? you were diagnosed a year ago. i had to take some time off my course, as a student nurse. i have had nine months and i started back
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last week said it had an impact on my education as well as my life more broadly. you are right, health care professionals a re broadly. you are right, health care professionals are notoriously bad. we had to prioritise our health care needs. you have to take the time and attention to make these appointments. and the message you have now you would have told yourself a couple of years ago, not to be frightened or embarrassed, it is important to go? absolutely, it could save your life. if i had not gone for that appointment, i don't know what situation i would be in now. and if i went earlier, maybe i would not have had the last 18 months that i have had. it is very good at you to talk to us about it, thank you forjoining us. in a moment the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. as pressure mounts on him to quit, ukip leader henry bolton is due to make a statement.
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it follows a mass series of walk—outs from within his party. the head of the army warns that britain is struggling to keep up with russia's military capabilities and needs more money and not more cuts. two men are convicted of the murder of businessman guy hedger, who was shot dead during a botched burglary at his million pound home in dorset. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the imf drops its forecast for the uk economic growth this year to 1.5%, as it raises its forecast for the global economy as a whole to just under a%. but others beg to differ. lord o'neill tells the bbc, never mind brexit, the uk economy will do better than anyone has been expecting. and he's a former treasury minister and a remain supporter. len mccluskey, general secretary of the union unite, has had what he calls "encouraging" talks with the head of peugeot, carlos tavares in paris.
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peugeot has announced 650 job cuts at vauxhall‘s ellesmere port plant. mr mcclusky said mr tavares talked of "working with unite to construct a road map forfuture operations in the uk." tesco is to cut 1700 jobs from its branches and warehouses as part of its turnaround strategy. it also plans to create 900 jobs and redeploy staff affected also the chief executive said it was necessary to ensure their business remains competitive. what is going on at tesco? it is pa rt what is going on at tesco? it is part of ongoing restructuring. we have been doing some number crunching, since 201a they have lost something like 10,000 jobs, trying to streamline themselves and restructure. they are getting rid of 1700 and creating 900. so about 800
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going in total as a net result. it is to do with changing the roles of various is to do with changing the roles of various managers is to do with changing the roles of various managers in shop floors and warehouses but the bigger story is the kind of pressure that all of these supermarkets are under. sainsbury‘s announced 2000 job losses in october. these losses are coming from changing shopping habits, people changing the way they shop, often small shops and more regularly. and the likes of algae and little —— and the discounters are taking away the business but on the other hand they are still holding their own. the tesco figures at christmas were not too bad and sainsbury did reasonably
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well. it is not all doom and gloom but they keep on cutting away at the jobs and streamlining and restructuring their businesses. and talking about car insurance, anybody who drives... i havejust talking about car insurance, anybody who drives... i have just had a look at mine! it has gone up!” who drives... i have just had a look at mine! it has gone up! i have seen your parking, i'm not surprised! but for the rest of us who don't wreck cars, it is still going up! don't say that on public television! that's embarrassing! and costly! it's just gone up a bit more! anyway... let's talk about this, it has gone up by something like 8.5%! it is all those young folk out there! “m2555: l 55’”? — — , it is all those young folk out there! “m2555: 1 gfiagflgg— — , crazy, it is thousands for anybody under 25. the average figure is
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£827, that is the average. and if you start the car it goes up! but they have got to over a barrel. why is it going up? we can talk to amanda stratton from confused.com. is it going up? we can talk to am. us a stratton from confused.com. is it going up? we can talk to am. us rfié more om? confused. com. is it going up? we can talk to am. us rfié more details fused. com. is it going up? we can talk to am. us rfié more details about com. is it going up? we can talk to am. us rfié more details about why. tell us some more details about why it is going up. obviously because of the way that you two are driving and parking! but br seeing rises across the market and young people are suffering —— we are seeing. it comes down to three things, changes to insurance premium tax which has gone up insurance premium tax which has gone up dramatically in the last couple of years. changes to the ogden rate which obviously had a big impact at the way that insurers were quoting, particularly for younger drivers. and of course there has been the general cost of repair, new cars cost an awful lot more to prepare and we are seeing that reflected in premiums. what about the whiplash effect, the fact that so many people
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are claiming for whiplash? a lot of the book are blaming the premiums on that —— a lot of people. the book are blaming the premiums on that -- a lot of people. they could be right, we are just an aggregator so we be right, we are just an aggregator so we cannot, on the actual claims made to insurance companies but like many people, i received multiple calls every week saying, i gather you have been involved in a crash, do you want to claim for whiplash, when i have not been involved in any. it is a serious issue. what do you do about it, faced with your next insurance bill? new legislation by the government says that with your new premium, your old premium price has to be quoted as well and thatis price has to be quoted as well and that is very valuable for consumers. it shows them how much their premiums are going up, particularly the complacent ones who just let it roll and repeat. we are confident you can save money by going to a price comparison site like confused.com, but there are others, because we know we can save you
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money and we are so because we know we can save you money and we are so confident we can do that on your renewal that we will match the price and give you a pound if we can't. what this shows is you can save money if you shop around. i know one of the big concern is for drivers is losing that no claims bonus if they move every year but you can move that bonus with you. thank you very much. see you later, aggregator! i had to say that, sorry! more serious matters. the pound has weakened a bit against the euro. not very exciting i'm afraid. thank you very much. one thing, the betting shops, there is a worry... didn't they see that coming? very good! a lot of investors have seen
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it coming because they think they will lower the maximum bet you can put on the fixed odds betting terminals. i will do some rehearsing before the next hour. thank you very much. nearly 1000 children's centres across england have not been inspected by ofsted for more than five years. the government temporarily suspended inspections in 2015. the charity action for children says its left hundreds of thousands of parents with no idea how good their local centre is, as marc ashdown reports. for babies and toddlers, it is a chance to play. for parents, a chance to socialise and get free support from health workers. there are 3000 or so children's centres across england. like schools, ofsted inspects them for safety and quality. in 2015, the government decided to consult over their future and told inspectors to stop inspecting. the charity action for childrefirsays an inspection have not had one.
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that is a0% of the total. in that time, councils have invested £1.a billion in children's centres, but it is not clear how well the money has been spent. what it means is that local authorities under pressure for cash, if the centres are not inspected, they are sort of invisible. what that means is that it is much easier to close them. two years ago, alka lost her mother just before giving birth to her son and was heading towards depression. at the centres were not here to help me, and the health visitor, one consistent person throughout to help me, i'm not sure how we would have coped, and i don't think we would have coped very well. these centres are a lifeline. ofsted confirmed that the inspections are still suspended. the department for education said robust and regular partial inspections do still take place. the most active volcano in the philippines, mount mayon, has erupted again. ash and lava fragments have been released into the atmosphere, shrouding nearby
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villages in darkness. officials have raised the alert level. a0,000 people have fled the surrounding area in the past week. howard johnson reports from manila. a huge plume of smoke reaching ten kilometres into the sky signalled that mayon had begun erupting again. the midday explosion sent lava, molten rocks and steam cascading down its slopes. within hours, the ash began to fall, engulfing nearby towns and villages. dramatic photos on social media show traffic at a standstill as the ash cloud engulfed towns and villages. officials in the philippines have raised the alert level to four on a scale where five is the highest warning because of an imminent threat of a violent eruption. lava has been flowing from the volcano since it became active more than a week ago. thousands of families have already been evacuated from the area and an eight—kilometre exclusion zone has been put in place.
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many have sought shelter in legazpi city, around ten kilometres away from the volcano. the airport there is currently closed until further notice because of the ash cloud. mayon volcano has had a long history of deadly eruptions. four foreign tourists and local guide were killed when it last erupted in may 2013. howard johnson, bbc news, manila in the philippines. let's get a look at the weather. the trend to something milder is underway, still a lot of lying snow in northern ireland, scotland and northern england and that. two thoughts in the coming days. some interesting temperature contrasts —— that will start to thaw. most of us will be in double figures by tomorrow and some parts of wales and
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western england could reach 15 celsius because we have lost that cold air, the wind has changed direction pushing milder air across the country. a quiet evening, still some icy stretches in the north of scotla nd some icy stretches in the north of scotland and north east england. dry for many at first but later on the next wet and windy weather comes into western areas. milder, 3—9dc, but more unsettled day tomorrow. strengthening winds, outbreaks of rain on off. 8am, the rush—hour, a fairly wet start across western and northern scotland, heavy and persistent rain coupled with a strengthening wind but very mild. that will clear from northern ireland, more rain in the afternoon, a lot of mist and low cloud with some poor visibility in places. it looks like the rain will cover north—east england and east anglia, across the ma corridor also as it clears, still quite a bit of cloud
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and mistand clears, still quite a bit of cloud and mist and also some strong winds on the western coasts. at some point tomorrow we will all have some rain but not all the time. at that clears that should be some good spells of sunshine for a time but also more showery rain coming eastwards through the afternoon. quite windy but much milder, 10—13dc. some parts of wales and western england could reach 1a or 15. berry in settled on tuesday night in the wednesday, you can see these isobars which might bring gales —— very unsettled. the rain will continue to move south—eastwards on wednesday, quite u nsettled south—eastwards on wednesday, quite unsettled midweek and behind it, temperatures starting to drop. 12 or 13 in the south compared to seven or eight further north. quite windy end to the week but it will ease on friday, sunshine and showers and feeling a bit colder. hello, you're watching afternoon live. a wave of resignations from key positions hits ukip — as pressure mounts on leader
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henry bolton to quit. we're expecting a statement shortly. a court hears a man accused of driving a van into a crowd of people near two mosques in london wanted to kill as many muslims as possible. the head of the army warns that britain is struggling to keep up with russia's military and needs more money, not more cuts. in the us, hundreds of thousands of federal workers are waking up unable to work because of a government shutdown coming up all the sport. sad news aboutjimmy armfield. sad news about jimmy armfield. yes, good afternoon. sad news for eve ryo ne good afternoon. sad news for everyone involved with football in this country and us here at bbc sport of course, the former england captain and bbc football pun kit jimmy armfield passes away —— pundit. alina has the weather. there isa
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pundit. alina has the weather. there is a lot of snow on the ground for scotland, northern ireland and northern england, but not for long because things are turning milder, we could see highs tomorrow of 14 or 15. tell you all about it in half an hour. thank you very much. also coming up. more wedding bells in windsor. buckingham palace announces prince andrew's daughter princess eugenie is getting married in the autumn. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. pressure is continuing to mount on the ukip leader henry bolton after a string of resignations of senior members this morning. we are hearing the work and pensions spokes hasjoined we are hearing the work and pensions spokes has joined others we are hearing the work and pensions spokes hasjoined others who have all quit:. .
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they've all stood down in protest at henry bolton's . refusal to quit as leader — following a string of revelations about his private life — even though the party executive backed a vote of no confidence in him. mrbolton is due to make a statement shortly. our political correspondent alex forysth, reports. i'm not making any comment. despite growing pressure, he says he's not going anywhere, henry bolton insisting he wants to keep leading ukip, even though the ruling body says he should quit and now, a string of senior members have resigned because he will not go. including margot parker, who stepped down as deputy leader, mike hookem has quit as assistant deputy, tim aker, as local government spokesman, david curtin, as front man for education, william dartmouth has given up his job as trade spokesman, and john bickley has walked away from his role with immigration. if he hangs around politics, given what has happened and the nature of everything that has happened, it will not be good for him or everyone he is with. my advice would be, look, henry,
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we don't want to keep arguing with you and causing you any more trouble, why don't you just go and sort out your personal life. it is over his relationship with 25—year—old jo marney, he says it is over after she had to apologise for sending racist text messages, that has not appeased critics. after being elected only four months ago, promising to restore unity, his position risks tearing the party apart. this is where ukip has marked some of its big moments, outside europe house, a key eu base in london, but after its success in the brexit referendum, ukip lost direction and has been plagued by bitter infighting, with four leaders in just over a year, prompting some to ask whether now anyone can lead this party back from the brink. the party chairman today insisted ukip still has a role in representing those who backed brexit. that is why ukip are so important and why we must stay on the field of play, get our house in order
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and do it quickly, but once we have, we have a purpose. and those 17.4 million voters are it. our correspondent is there in folkestone. what are we expecting him to say? well, any minute now we are expecting henry bolton to come down this ramp and make a short statement. all the indications are that he is going nowhere. he has stuck to his guns firmly since this episode emerged last week with his now ex—girlfriend, insisting he doesn't want a distraction of a leadership contest saying ukip can afford it politically or financially. but there has been wave
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of resignations now from his top team, our calculations are there are now 12 people who have resigned from their positions, more than half of his top team now calling on him to go because there is now about four weeks until a meeting of the ukip membership where they will decide what will happen to henry bolton after the ruling body, the nec of ukip voted in a vote of no confidence. all the signs are he wa nts to confidence. all the signs are he wants to ride it out for the next few weeks to hold in there, he thinks he has enough support to stay in place for now. he is going to be on the radio later appearing on a show alongside the host, one nigel farage. yes, we do understand he is going to be going on the radio later. i am sure it will very much depend on what he says in the next few minutes here. but he has been quite bullish about his position. we
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haven't heard from him since that vote at the nec last night but prior to that he has been defending his conduct and the way he has handled this whole affair. he says he has ended the relationship now withjo marney and he says that he wants to carry on in his position in this — and ukip needs to get back to being on its message of brexit. but i think interesting to hear what happens this evening when he is up against his former leader nigel farage in this radio phone—in. i think what is clear is that if he does hold on in his position, he does hold on in his position, he does say today that he intends to stay in post, there will still be considerable pressure on him and questions about the future of ukip, how can it carry on when so many of its spokespeople don't have confidence in their leader? really it raises further existential questions for ukip that the party has been grappling with since the
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brexit referendum. it failed to make any inroads in last year's general election, it was haemorrhaging councillors at the local elections and is struggling to find a new purpose since britain voted to leave the eu and henry bolton is now at the eu and henry bolton is now at the — the third new leader since nigel farage, if he chooses to resign it would trigger a fourth leadership contest that ukip cannot afford right now. fair to say, all these resignations, these names aren't household ones that have quit. no, and i think that underlines a wider problem for ukip, even henry bolton himself was not a household name... he is going to appear now. it lookses like he is about to come down the road, so i will get out of the way. we are all relying on one photographer standing at the door giving us the thumbs up! we can't quite see him yet. we are talking about household names but
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henry bolton was really not a household name when he took over as leader only in september. he was thrust into the spotlight then. no one had heard of him and indeed that has been some of the criticism that has been some of the criticism that has been some of the criticism that has been levelled at him since he took over that post in september, that he hasn't made enough of a splash, not got the ukip message out there, hasn't made enough of an impact in that position. one of his collea g u es impact in that position. one of his colleagues called him a naive political lightweight and that was one of the descriptions that's been given to him since this episode. this is another problem that since nigel farage has left that leadership position, ukip has been struggling to be recognised and such a strong personality in nigel farage, with successive leaders, diane james, she lasted a mere three weeks in that position, paul nuttall after her. now henry bolton after paul nuttall. i think the
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recognisable figures within ukip are twinnedling. certainly membership is twinnedling. certainly membership is twinnedling too and i think that's something hen erith bolton has been struggling to get to grips with —— henry. voting to leave the eu, the vote of ukip, that's what people are focussing on, what is the point of ukip now? and that's something paul nuttall, the previous leader, tried to reinvent the party, the message at last year's general election was ukip were going to be the guard dogs of brexit, paul nuttall had a strong message on cultural integration, immigration, taking a hard line on immigration, taking a hard line on immigration, he hoped that message would help to reinvigorate his party and it clearly didn't cut through. ukip support collapsed at the last general election. it is struggling to reinvent itself since the brexit referendum and i think that — thought there was another flurry of movement there to suggest that henry bolton was about to come out. i
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don't think he is yet. if he does choose to stay in post, he will have to struggle and get a message out there to try and convince voters ukip still has a role in today's political climate, that ukip has a message to sell, it has a strong position and indeed it can keep itself together, there are concerns among members that finances are in troubles as well, it has lost its biggest donor with aaron banks, he had been previously funding the party and there are various signs that ukip is in trouble structurally as well. it's a tough job to be leader of this party at the moment, many things to grapple with. henry bolton, it appears, many things to grapple with. henry bolton, itappears, clearly many things to grapple with. henry bolton, it appears, clearly wants to continue in that role. i am reading his statement now, the one he will be reading outside in a moment. that photographer... oh, look, the photographer... oh, look, the photographer is getting on his knees which means he is about to come out. he is saying i am not quitting, also
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saying, and quoting donald trump, it's time to drain the swamp after his own party... enough from me. let's hear from his own party... enough from me. let's hearfrom him. his own party... enough from me. let's hear from him. here we go. a bit closer, come right up to the microphone. all right here? a bit closer. ok? sorry to keep you all waiting. ladies and gentlemen, yesterday the ukip national executive committee decided to initialiate and embark upon a constitutional course to remove me as leader of the party. i did advise that yesterday's meeting, i advised the nec, not to expose the party to the nec, not to expose the party to the financial and political cost of that course of action. and that includes the political cost of possibly yet another leadership contest. i urged the nec to focus instead upon the unity and cohesion of the party and on the need to
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concentrate on such matters as the local government election campaign and the necessity of mobilising our effo rts and the necessity of mobilising our efforts to ensure that the government delivers a truly independent united kingdom when we leave the european union. independence in all areas of governance and administration. i shall respect the next steps in the constitutional process and will therefore not be resigning as party leader. i shall repeat, i will not be resigning as party leader. instead, during the next four weeks, i shall be calling for the co—ordination and mobilisation of all leave campaigns to ensure that the government delivers full independence from the european union in all areas of government and administration. and i shall be calling for the party itself to mobilise in order to support that effort. this is the most pressing matter facing our nation and effort. this is the most pressing matterfacing our nation and i am
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determined not to allow the nec to distract the party away from participating forcefully in the independence debate. now without reflecting at all on its individual members, the nec has presently constituted, is unfit for purpose and has severely handicapped the pa rty‘s progress and has severely handicapped the party's progress and political delivery for some years. as recent ukip leaders can attest. it has not only lost the confidence of me as the party leader, in its ability to act objectively as the party's governing body, it has also lost the confidence of a large proportion of the party's membership. the nec does require significant and urgent reform, to that end, again, during the coming weeks, i shall be proposing a new party constitution with a newly constituted and reformed national executive committee. likewise, it is time to
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put an end to the infighting that's been going on within the party for sometime. and to remove those who have been part of that. in a single phrase, it is time to drain the swamp. let me reiterate, however, that the most pressing issue facing our country and ukip is to ensure that we gain full independence from the european union, that we do not allow the government to betray the country by compromising on that goal. that object is the object to which i shall be directing all of my energies in the coming weeks. thank you very much. there you have it, henry bolton insisting he is staying in place and pretty strong message there for ukip's ruling body, the ney, he used donald trump's phrase of draining the swamp, saying he wanted to
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reboot the nec, saying he is going to be propose ago new party constitution, the nec which of course last night voted against him ina course last night voted against him in a vote of no confidence, saying that nec was not fit for purpose. so, pretty bullish and defy apt message from henry bolton. we had expected he wouldn't announce his resignation but instead he says he is going to be using the next four weeks before the party's next general meeting to try to push for the party's nec to be reformed and he says he is going to try and convene and mobilise all leave campaigners so ukip can continue to play a full role in the referendum, the brexit debate and he is saying that the nec's decision to vote against him in the vote of no confidence was a distraction for the party and not — and the party cannot fulfil its function in playing a role in the brexit debate. i think hard—hitting there from henry bolton who is determined to stay in his post and he looks like he is taking on those in his party who are
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calling on him to resign, including the ruling body, the nec, and laying down the gauntlet. when a party leader tax on the nec of his own party —— takes on the nec of his own party —— takes on the nec of his own party it never ends well, does it? he called for an end to the infighting but i think this will not go any way to ending that infighting, his statementjust now, ukip has seen various strands, various groups within it, arguing about its purpose, about the direction that it should take. here we are having more than half of his top team coming out against him and resigning from their positions, calling on him to stand down and for the sake of the party and henry bolton defrmed to resist. he has been —— determined to resist. he has been —— determined to resist. he has been defiant, this will raise hackles within his party, he has been implored to go and he has dug in his heels and said i am going
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nowhere. thank you very much. you are watching afternoon live. the head of the army says the government must invest more in the armed forces or risk falling behind potential enemies. in a speech later this afternoon, general sir nick carter will say britain can't afford to sit back while countries like russia improve their capabilities. his comments have been approved by the defence secretary gavin williamson and come amid speculation that the military is to face more cuts. let's speak to johnny let's speak tojohnny mercer, a former captain in the british army and will know that no head of any army has ever said they want to face more cuts, why is this such a significant statement?” more cuts, why is this such a significant statement? i think it's significant statement? i think it's significant because he outlines how the threat is changing that we are up the threat is changing that we are up against, i have been saying for sometime that the character of conflict is changing and the only thing that should define our military is the enemy we are up against. yes, we are paying 2%, yes,
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defence expenditure since 2016 is increasing, but, look, the threat is intensifying, the threat is growing, the prime minister has said that and i think the prime minister has said that and ithink in the prime minister has said that and i think in the face of these proposed reductions it's the right thing to come out and lay out a vision, certainly what people like me are looking for, what does defence look like in ten, 15 years' time. our defence when it comes to threats like russia depends on nato, surely? of course it does. i don't think he is trying to compare them ina think he is trying to compare them in a battle, he is using it to articulate the argument, the threat we are facing is changing. well, he says, sorry to interrupt, he says the uk would struggle and is struggling in the face of an increasing power in terms of russia. to be frank, it's not going to be up to little old united kingdom, we are punching above our weight if we think we are... clearly we would be pa rt think we are... clearly we would be part of nato and that would come into play. he is talking about specific cyber attacks that russia
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may wish to use on us, i think it's not a huge stretch to look at the way they've operated in the ukraine and syria to think they may try and use new techniques in warfare to get at the united kingdom and he is articulating that threat. i don't think he is saying we would ever go toe—to—toe with russia. clearly nato comes into play in that. but there are individual cases of attacks coming from countries that wish to do us harm, whether it's coming from countries that wish to do us harm, whether its north korea in the nhs that are damaging this country and we saw that last summer, he is right to bring this to the table and this discussion out into the open. it's funny you mention the nhs, in your constituency surgeries, what are they talking about, is it lack of money for the army and the navy and air force or the lack of money for the army and the navy and airforce or the nhs? lack of money for the army and the navy and air force or the nhs?” come from a military city and it's a culmination of the three, i did have someone come to the surgery last week and ask to pay more tax to pay for the nhs. i don't think money is
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the answer to these things. it is pa rt the answer to these things. it is part of the answer. look, if you look at the nhs... part of the answer. look, if you look at the nhs. .. that's what he is asking for, he is asking for more money. it is about money. yes, part of is about money, but part is how do we change ourselves and mould ourselves to meet the challenge, which in this case is russia and a changing face of conflict, but in the nhs it's ever increasing demand that everybody knows about against only so much money that the government can pay for. look, things are changing and people look to us as politicians to come up with a nswe rs. as politicians to come up with answers. thank you very much. a man accused of driving a van into a crowd of people near two mosques in north london wanted to kill as many muslims a possible, a court has heard at the opening of the trail. darren osborne is accused of deliberately driving a van into worshippers, killing one person. angus crawford is following the case. he gave more details of the prosecution's opening statement. . .
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the prosecution has made it clear there are no terrorist offences on this indictment per se but they're clear, the prosecutor said this was an act of terrorism designed to influence government and intimidate the muslim community. darren osbourne has denied one count of murder and attempted murder. the prosecution continued, they say that in his attack he planned to kill as many people as possible. so what happened ? we were told that on 18thjune last year he hired a van in cardiff. he drove it all the way to london. his initial target, thejury heard, was to be a march taking place that day but he couldn't get close. he drove around the area for hours until he came to finsbury park. there he saw a man who collapsed on the street, he was unwell, he had been attended to by a group of men in muslim dress, they had been attending prayers. the prosecution say he swerved his van off the road, driving into mr ali, killing him and injuring seriously several others. nhs england has been asked
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to explain changes to the way hospitals calculate their figures for accident and emergency treatment times. the uk statistics authority says the alterations could have left people reaching misleading conclusions. faye kirkland is a freelance health reporter who also works as a gp. i asked her if things were worse than we thought? this is about transparency of data really. so for years hospitals have calculated how many patients are seen in the four—hour target, they may have included the main hospital a&e, so major trauma centre and walk—in centres if the trust run it or they happen to be on the same grounds as the hospital. even if they weren't nhs walk—in centres? on the same grounds they could. that was according to guidance from nhs england which has been around since 2015, it's very clear, but the bbc has seen two e—mails, from nhs improvement, another nhs body, suggesting
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to trusts performance wasn't as good as it would like to the end of september, early october. and gave trusts what they would say was a green light to add in walk—in centres they don't run and are not on the hospital grounds. so, for example, trusts added in walk—in centres miles away run by private providers, like virgin. that's in conflict to guidance? and the department of health are saying trusts should be calculating reporting the data as nhs england has said. we are talking about targets, talking about figures, talking about statistics. people on the front line are going to say the last thing we need is to have to go back and do this again, is that going to have to happen? that's something nhs england and nhs improvement are going to have to consider. the stats regulator want people to have confidence in the data, they want it to be transparent. if changes have been made the public should be able to see that because if you are looking at your local hospital, there is a question whether the data from october onwards is comparable
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to last year's october and for some trusts, you won't be able to compare year on year. in terms of what happens next, we are going to get new figures when? we don't know. we are waiting for nhs improvement to respond. henry bolton saying he is staying as ukip leader. let's go to ukip's former education spokesman who joins me from westminster. the nec said yesterday no confidence. you are one i think now of 11 people who have left the front bench of the party. this is a mess, isn't it? well, it's extraordinary situation. everyone expected henry bolton to be a figure of stability when he came into the leadership in september, but wejust had one debacle after another. this yearin had one debacle after another. this year in january, had one debacle after another. this year injanuary, it's notjust the nec that's lost confidence, notjust the spokespeople but the party
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membership as a whole, people in grass roots. there is so many letters a nd grass roots. there is so many letters and emails going around to me and other people who had senior positions in his team saying he has got to go, we don't like what he's done, we don't like how he is — the situation in his life, which his private life, which does reflect on the party. nspccinging personally as education spokesman —— speaking personally as education spokesman, i have done work to build bridges with ukip, church groups, family groups, children's groups and a lot of that has just been jeopardised by what people see and people don't want anything to do with the party at the moment while he is still the leader. what specifically was it that happened that made you think i can't work with this any more? as i said, the work i have been doing as an education spokesman in the london assembly as well is to try to build links with other people in the
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community to try to improve ukip's image ina community to try to improve ukip's image in a way, we have so much... sorry, i know that's what you have been doing, but what was it about him, the well publicised texts from his then girlfriend, he then split up his then girlfriend, he then split up with her, what is it about what he has done that you are so objecting to? i think yes, he did split up with her, but then he was seen with her later on having dinner and so on with her in the liberal clu b and so on with her in the liberal club in london later in the week and he wrote a letter, an article for the telegraph putting — wearing his heart on his sleeve, telling the public all about his private life, his feelings and in that article he compared ukip to the taliban. i think that is really quite an insult on the members and the hard—working activists who have spent years, if not decades, fighting for a referendum, fighting for brexit,
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standing in local councils and put ago lot of time and money and effort into the party and they don't like to be compared to the taliban, quite frankly! and don't like what he has done. looking to later, the rumour is he is going on lbc radio, the host of which is one nigel farage. he is taking a phone—in. if you ring m, he is taking a phone—in. if you ring in, what's your question to him? my question is why? what do you hope to achieve by staying on for another four weeks? i really don't see he has any chance of surviving in the extraordinary general meeting which will have to be within four weeks. i wrote to him to suggest you can leave with dignity now, the nec has voted unanimously to allow the membership to have a vote. the nec has been getting thousands of e—mails from people, members around the country. they‘ re e—mails from people, members around the country. they're reflecting the membership. i don't think he has
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much chance. why do you not go now? why do you want to stick it out for another four weeks, what do you possibly hope to achieve by that?” am looking at the latest odds. 4—1 nigel farage will be the next leader of ukip. you are at 5—1. you are high on the list, would you want it, if it was available, we should stress at the moment it isn't. it's not available. obviously there is a small possibility they will vote to keep him on as leader. i can't see that happening. if there was another leadership contest i would certainly consider throwing my name into the ring, into the hat again. i have done so before. i came third in the previous leadership contest. i believe in this party. i believe we still have immense purpose for brexit and for beyond, brexit is under threat at the moment. you have nick clegg has written a book about how to overthrow brexit, it's a popular book. there is a lot of
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attempt to overturn it. we need to get our act together to start putting the message that we are going to be a successful and prosperous country, we need either a good dealfor the prosperous country, we need either a good deal for the country or it's better to leave with no deal rather than a bad deal which is — that message has been lost because all the focus the last couple of weeks has been on mr bolton's private life, there's been nothing about brexit, certainly hasn't been anything about education defence or anything about education defence or anything else going on in the country. thank you very much for your time. nigel farage hasjust your time. nigel farage has just tweeted he your time. nigel farage hasjust tweeted he has an exclusive interview with the ukip leader later tonight. nothing is off the table, he says. that's for later on. you are watching afternoon live. you can let us know what you think by tweeting us. all the ways of contacting us are on the screen. time for a look at the weather. that's davos.
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they've had so much snow there. it's a ski resort. also the avalanche risk is really high. it's been a phenomenal season across the european alps. are we going to get a break? that's lying snow in scotland. these were the temperatures
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yesterday, the atom into the south—west. by tomorrow we will all be in the milder air, some places could see 14 or 15 celsius. we have lost that cold feeling, the winds change direction, pushing that milderair change direction, pushing that milder air across the country and in fa ct we milder air across the country and in fact we have had some good spells of sunshine this afternoon. temperatures only nine or ten but in the sunshine it almost looks springlike! most of the showers in scotla nd springlike! most of the showers in scotland and northern england have just about gone, a couple lingering, a few icy stretches in parts of north—east scotland and north east england. later on the next spell of wet and windy weather comes into the west of the uk. milder night, 3—9dc, but more unsettled tomorrow. outbreaks of rain moving quickly
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eastwards coupled with a strengthening south—westerly wind. quite a miserable rush—hour with some persistent rain in scotland but at least it is mild. that will clear from northern ireland but more through the day. a lot of cloud around with mist and fog and poor visibility. persistent rain in north—east england and east anglia, london and across the ma corridor. still quite a bit of cloud as it clears with mist and fog and a strengthening wind but still mild which is the theme of the day. but we are all going to see some rain, not all the time, the morning rain will clear, some sunshine and it will clear, some sunshine and it will feel quite warm in places. later in the opening another band of showery rain coming across but a blustery and damp day but very mild. parts of wales and western england could reach 14 or 15, quite a contrast. but the next system will arrive overnight from the atlantic,
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with gales, if not severe gales for a time along with heavy outbreaks of rain and that will continue to sink its weight south—eastwards on wednesday with some strong winds. some sunshine behind that, and then temperatures fall away in the north, seven or eight celsius but 12 or 13 further south and at the end of the week it will state windy, particularly on thursday with some sunshine and showers. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the leader of ukip, henry bolton, has delivered a defiant statement saying he will not be resigning despite a number of senior party figures giving up their posts over his it is now time to put an end to the factional infighting that has been going on within the party for some time and to remove those who have been part of that. a court has heard a man accused of driving a van into a crowd of people near two mosques in london wanted to kill as many
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muslims as possible. the head of the army warns that the military may struggle to respond to future threats without further investment. there's a call for nhs england to explain changes to the recording of a&e data, after fears it could have left people reaching "misleading conclusions". two men have been found guilty of the murder of businessman guy hedger, who was shot dead during a botched burglary at his million pound home. and princess eugenie has got engaged to her boyfriend, jack brooksbank. the couple will marry in the autumn, at st george's chapel in windsor. sport now and reaction to the death ofa sport now and reaction to the death of a legend, sport now and reaction to the death ofa legend,jimmy sport now and reaction to the death of a legend, jimmy armfield. yes, awful news, the passing of the former england captain jimmy armfield at the age of 82. part of england's world cup winning squad in 1966 but he missed the success through injury.
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he only ever played for one club, blackpool's greatest, playing over 600 times for the club in a 17—year period. but really he was universally loved for his kind nature. his former team—mate sir bobby charlton said he was "the most honest and genuine gentlemen, he'd had the good fortune to meet". armfield went on to manage bolton wanderers and leeds before spending over 40 years with the bbc as a football expert. to many he was one of the voices of the sport. especially on radio. he had received treatment for cancer over the past decade. but he will be sorely sorely missed by all who knew him. quite a statement from bobby charlton who many also see at one of the big gentlemen of the business. and scotland still on the hunt for a new manager? yes, they are. the scottish fa have been very courteous today, saying they respect michael o'neill‘s decision. but given there rather public chase
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of the northern ireland boss and the clear intent that he was their firm favourite to replace gordon strachan, this may well be seen by some as a bit of an embarrassment for the sfa. o'neill, by the way, said it was "a huge honour to be offered the position", however he does not feel that this is the right opportunity for me at this moment in my career". here's more from our scotland football reporter, chris mclaughlin. they do have time on their side, they do not have a qualifying match until september so they can take as long as they like. but it will be interesting to see exactly who. alex mcleish has been mentioned, steve clarke, the kilmarnock manager, also derek mcinnes, the boss of aberdeen. but it will be interesting to see who exactly they do turn to given that michael o'neill was such a strong favourite for so long. 21—year—old heung chung said his "dreams had come true" after he shocked novak djokovic in the fourth round of the australian open. the world number 58 came past
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the six—time champion in straight sets last night to become the first korean singles player to reach the quarterfinals of a grand slam. he'll face fellow last eight debutant tennys sandgren next. when i'm young i am just trying to copy novak because he's my idol! i can't believe this, dreams come true tonight. he was the better player on the court tonight. he deserved to win, no question about it. whenever he was in trouble he came up with some unbelievable shots, passing shots and just from the back of the court he was like a wall also it is impressive and i wish him all the best. greg rutherford won't be defending his long jump title at this year's commonwealth games. he's pulled out of team england due to what he called "a lack of preparation". rutherford took gold in glasgow four years ago but his decision to take
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some time away from athletics has left him feeling unable to sufficiently prepare to compete on australia's gold coast in april. 400 metres hurdles runnerjacob paul has taken his place in the squad. that is all the sport for now, i will have more in the next hour. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. mary rhodes is in birmingham, where midlands today have been given access to one of the main carillion building projects a week after the construction giant's collapse. and in a moment i'll be speaking to donna traynor in belfast about the potholes which are costing the department of infrastructure £500,000 in compensation to affected drivers. but first to mary in birmingham. carillion is a huge story for all of
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us but how has it affected birmingham city centre? this is a story of paradise lost or at least suspended because carillion was involved in a project right in the city centre next to be council officers on the old site of paradise circus, the redevelopment of £700 million which was going to involve office blocks and a public space but it has been invalid quiet in the last week. work stopped immediately on monday with the news of the colla pse on monday with the news of the collapse of carillion. not only responsible for the first phase of redevelopment but also health and safety on the site. there were some activities this morning when i drove past but those diggers and the cranes were involved in demolition work and not building. what does it mean? the project leader for the whole of the redevelopment is rob gross. his company has worked
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closely with carillion over the last few months but the news of the colla pse few months but the news of the collapse came to a great surprise to them. it was a shock to be honest. the liquidation part was definitely a shock, we had been keeping a careful eye on what had been going on and had been in discussions with them but none of us expected liquidation. you have to move very quickly because carillion were responsible for health and safety. so where does this leave that development and others in the west midlands? it isa it is a massive problem. rob groves was not able to let us know by a new contract that would be taking over so that project has completely stalled and that is just the first phase of this £700 million project. birmingham city council have written to the work and pensions secretary, esther mcvey, to get some sort of reassurance that the economic regeneration of birmingham will not be affected. there is an ironic
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twist, one of the first companies due to work into paradise circus was pwc, who of course are looking after the liquidation of carillion. that isa the liquidation of carillion. that is a private project and one public project, £350 million building of a new super hospital in the black country and that is now totally on hold. it was already six months behind schedule so the cost is likely to go up. it was meant to be completed in spring next year but we have no idea when it will be now. good to see you, thank you for that. let's cross now to donna traynor in belfast, where potholes are causing misery on the roads. you have got three pictures which illustrate the problem! good afternoon, yes, they tell the story. it is all about potholes. in northern ireland recently we have had some new dual carriageway is built but when you look at the rest of the network, the state of the roads is a bit patchy. the recent
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wintry weather adding snow and ice has caused added problems. when that goes into the potholes, they expand the surface so they are deeper and wider than before. i am sure many viewers across the country will tell you about potholes where they live but in northern ireland it has become particularly bad in recent months and years. how do the motoring public feel about all of this? i think ithinki i think i know the answer to this!” am sure, like me, especially in the middle of the night when you're driving along and suddenly... your tire goes into a pothole and it is difficult to manoeuvre. from a freedom of information request we have found that in the past two yea rs, have found that in the past two years, almost half £1 million has been paid out in compensation to motorists whose vehicles have been damaged by potholes or other road
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defects. motorists we have spoken to are fed up with it including this lady. the roads have been terrible with the first big freeze. they were ina bad with the first big freeze. they were in a bad condition long before decemberand in a bad condition long before december and there definitely should be more done. they are actually dangerous to drive on now so unless something is done, somebody will get killed. the department for infrastructure is trying to remedy the situation, their budget this year is £63 million for road maintenance but one expert has told us it could cost around £1 billion to rectify all of the problems across the network in northern ireland and as you know, austerity cuts, health and education are being prioritised in northern ireland and road maintenance is not on that list. the next story we will probably be doing is street lighting, we need more bulbs but
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they are not on the priority list as to public spending. thank you. thank you very much. if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can access them on the bbc iplayer and a reminder that we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live. two men have been sentenced to life in prison after being found guilty of murdering a businessman in an attempted burglary at his home in dorset. guy hedger was shot dead last april by kevin downton and jason baccus, who committed burglaries to fund their drug habits. they will both serve a minimum of 34 years behind bars. a third man, scott keeping, was acquitted. duncan kennedy reports.
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guy hedger was a well—respected, successful businessman with a passion for helping young people get a better education. but last april he was shot dead at his home here in an affluent neighbourhood not far from bournemouth. two men in balaclavas entered the bedroom he shared with his husband, simon, known as si, at around 3am in the morning. the masked men demanded the codes to two safes here in the house. in the confusion, si pressed a panic button and set off an alarm. it was then that guy hedger was shot. he died a few hours later. the prosecution said that this ford focus was the car used by the pair. it was caught on a number of security cameras earlier in the evening near the home of guy and simon hedger. but the same car then drove away from the scene. the prosecution say the pair went instead to rob this nearby catering company.
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it was kevin downton and jason baccus, two of the defendants, who later admitted they carried out this burglary. when they finished here, the prosecution say they drove back to guy hedger‘s home where mr hedger was shot. the place where you feel safe, your home, your castle as we call it, where you close the door and that is your comfort, to have that invaded in the middle of the night by masked individuals who came in with a loaded shotgun, it is almost unthinkable. the prosecution say a police lead came with the discovery of a cigarette butt near guy hedger‘s home. they say it contained the dna of jason baccus who was an associate of kevin downton. officers later recovered this shotgun which they believed was the murder weapon. and they were led to this bag in some undergrowth which contained watches and jewellery ta ken from guy hedger‘s home.
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as well as being a businessman, mr hedger was deeply involved in education and colleagues and the trust he helped run say his death has been devastating. i think the world has lost a man who was gentle, who was kind, who was willing to do whatever was needed to enhance the lives of people, in particular children. and the world is a poorer place for the loss of somebody like that. the four people on trial denied any involvement. kevin downton and jason baccus were both found guilty of murder. scott keeping was cleared of the murder. his wife helen was found not guilty of assisting an offender. the prosecution say guy hedger and his husband si were caught in the most violent of acts in what should have been the safest of places. duncan kennedy, bbc news.
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the imf has updated its forecast for the global kurikova predicting growth will accelerate to around a% this year and next —— big global economy. it singles out asia and europe as having already done better than expected. the managing director, christine lagarde, gave more details, describing it as welcome news but warned countries not to be complacent. there are still too many people who are left out of that recovery and acceleration of growth. around one fifth of emerging and
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